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Translation Courses - UK

To become an Axis Translations approved translator you must be a qualified translator, together with relevant translation experience. There is much more to being a translator (as you will discover) then simply speaking a second language.

Please click here if you are looking for a translation course in London.

On this basis, please find the following list of translation courses:

MA/PgD in Translation in a European context - Ashton University, Birmingham

The aim of this programme is to meet the growing need for translators with training in the application of a theoretical framework to translation performance. The course links the development of expertise in advanced translation skills (especially in the domain of legal and political texts) with critical discussion of theoretical aspects of translation. In addition, the programme encourages the development of an extensive understanding of European integration. Our MA/PgD provides an academic qualification for those intending to become (or who already are) professional translators. It will also appeal to teachers, linguists, and others interested in enhancing their competence in translation theory and practice. The programme offers a thorough grounding in research methods and is also a route to PhD research. This programme was launched by an international conference in 1997.

Course structure

(a) Full-time Postgraduate Diploma programme of nine months' duration. Full-time Master's programme of twelve months' duration.

(b) Part-time Postgraduate Diploma programme of eighteen months' duration. Part-time Master's programme of two to three years' duration.

Enrolment is normally in October. The part-time programme covers all the elements of the full-time programme, although not necessarily in the same sequence. The programme is available for single-language students (French or German) and for dual-language students (French and/or German and/or Spanish).

Course content
The programme comprises taught modules at Masters level (lectures, seminars, tutorials, and private study), including a foundation course in Research Methods. Teaching is through English, French and/or German and/or Spanish.

Modules:
The EU: A Web of Institutions
This module provides a deeper knowledge of EU politics in the widest sense which will enable you to understand contexts and to translate texts on such topics.

Theoretical Concepts of Translation Studies

This module familiarises you with the development of Translation Studies as a discipline, with contemporary translation theories, and with the disciplinary discourse. On completion of the module, you will be able to engage critically with the Translation Studies literature, reflect on different theories and controversial concepts.
Text Analysis for Translation
This module aims to consolidate your understanding of concepts and methods of linguistics and text analysis in order to apply this knowledge to a translation task.
Research Methods
In this module you will acquire knowledge of general research methods (qualitative and quantitative methods) as well as knowledge and practical experience of research methods which are specific to translation studies.
Practical Translation
You will practise operating within a particular theoretical framework which will allow you to make informed decisions in the production of a target text and to comment on your decisions.
Students choose two of the following:
Practical Translation: French-English
Practical Translation: German-English
Practical Translation: English-French
Practical Translation: English-German
Practical Translation: Spanish-English / English-Spanish

Dissertation
Students proceeding to the MA after successful completion of the taught modules, will write a 15,000 word dissertation, based on supervised study and research. The dissertation can be an essay on a variety of topics of relevance to translation, or a lengthy annotated translation, or an extended critique of a published translation. (Abstracts of sample dissertations of previous years).
The modules are supplemented by special guest lectures guest lectures . Students are also invited to take part in the research activities organised by the Institute for the Study of Language and Society. We can organise a visit to the Translation Service of the European Commission in Brussels.
All members of staff in the School are highly active in research. We achieved a '5' rating in the 2001 Research Assessment Exercise, which means that the School's research activity is recognised as being of outstanding international quality, and demonstrating research strength in both breadth and depth.

Assessment

Assessment is on a credit accumulation basis and by written examination or extended essay. Each module earns between 10 and 30 credits. The dissertation earns a total of 60 credits.

Admission

Applicants should normally have, or expect to obtain, a good Honours Degree in Translation Studies, or in French and/or German and/or Spanish, or equivalent qualification. Applicants may be asked to do a written test or come for an interview. Applicants whose first language is not English must have an IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or TOEFL 600 (250 computer-based) or equivalent. MA in TESOL and Translation Studies - Ashton University, Birmingham

Aims
The MA in TESOL and Translation Studies has been designed for those who wish to embark on a career in TESOL and who also wish to acquire additional expertise in Translation theory and practice. The programme provides participants with an up-to-date framework, based on linguistic, social and intercultural awareness, for developing expertise and theoretical knowledge in the area of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) and Translation Studies.

Course structure
(a) Full-time Master's programme of twelve months' duration.
(b) Part-time Master's programme of two to three years' duration.
Enrolment is normally in October. The part-time programme covers all the elements of the full-time programme, although not necessarily in the same sequence.

Content
The programme comprises taught modules at Masters level (lectures, seminars, tutorials, and private study), including a foundation course in Research Methods.

Modules:
Theoretical Concepts of Translation Studies
Text Analysis for Translation
English Teaching Practice
Approaches to Teaching and Learning
Corpus Linguistics
Dissertation (including Research Methods)
Choice of one of the following modules as option:
Approaches to Course and Materials Design
Specialised (LSP) Translation Project
Practical Translation: French - English
Practical Translation: German - English
Practical Translation: English - French
Practical Translation: English -German
Practical Translation: English - Spanish / Spanish - English

Assessment
Assessment is on a credit accumulation basis and by written examination or extended essay, except for Teaching in Practice where teaching performance will also be assessed. Students proceeding to the MA after successful completion of the taught modules will write a 15,000-word dissertation, based on supervised study and research.

Entry requirements
All participants must have a good honours degree or equivalent. Participants whose first language is not English must also have an IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or TOEFL 600 (250 computer-based) or equivalent. It may be possible for a participant with an IELTS score of 6.0 (or equivalent) to join the programme if they first attend a pre-sessional English Language course for 8 weeks, on campus. Participants with an IELTS score of 6.5 are also welcome to attend a 5 week pre-sessional.


MA IN ranslation Studies - Ashton University, Birmingham

Aims
The MA in Translation Studies is intended for those who wish to develop and further their knowledge and understanding of the discipline of Translation Studies. On completion, graduates will have acquired knowledge about the social role and function of translation for intercultural communication, cultural representation and perception. They will also have gained knowledge of theoretical frameworks that underpin the process of translation and related forms of intercultural communication and cultural exchange.

Course structure
(a) Full-time Postgraduate Diploma programme of nine months' duration. Full-time Master's programme of twelve months' duration.

(b) Part-time Postgraduate Diploma programme of eighteen months' duration. Part-time Master's programme of two to three years' duration.

Enrolment is normally in October. The part-time programme covers all the elements of the full-time programme, although not necessarily in the same sequence.

Content
The programme comprises taught modules at Masters level (lectures, seminars, tutorials, and private study), including a foundation course in Research Methods.

Modules:
Theoretical Concepts of Translation Studies
This module familiarises you with the development of Translation Studies as a discipline, with contemporary translation theories, and with the disciplinary discourse. On completion of the module, you will be able to engage critically with the Translation Studies literature, reflect on different theories and controversial concepts.

Text Analysis for Translation
This module aims to consolidate your understanding of concepts and methods of linguistics and text analysis in order to apply this knowledge to a translation task.

Research Methods
In this module you will acquire knowledge of general research methods (qualitative and quantitative methods) as well as knowledge and practical experience of research methods which are specific to translation studies.
Translation and the Representation of Cultures
This module links translation to other forms of cultural contact.
Specialised (LSP) Translation
This module familiarises you with aspects of language for specific purposes in their relevance for translation.
Analysing Written and Spoken Discourse
This module enables you to analyse and comment on written and spoken discourse.
The Translation Profession
In a number of workshops, you will learn about various aspects of the professional environment.

Dissertation
Students proceeding to the MA after successful completion of the taught modules, will write a 15,000 word dissertation, based on supervised study and research. The dissertation can be an essay on a variety of topics of relevance to translation, or a lengthy annotated translation, or an extended critique of a published translation. (Abstracts of sample dissertations of previous years).
The modules are supplemented by special guest lectures guest lectures . Students are also invited to take part in the research activities organised by the Institute for the Study of Language and Society.

Assessment
Assessment is on a credit accumulation basis and by written examination or extended essay. Each module earns between 10 and 30 credits. The dissertation earns a total of 60 credits.

Admission
Applicants should normally have, or expect to obtain, a good Honours degrees or equivalent. Applicants whose first language is not English must have an IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or TOEFL 600 (250 computer-based) or equivalent.

Applicants should demonstrate high-level performance in at least two languages (English should be one of them). It is expected that dual-language competence has been acquired separately before entering the programme. Holders of the Institute of Linguists' Diploma in Translation and Members of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI) may be awarded credits for prior experience.


European Master in Translation - Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh

The European Master in Translation is an innovative and professionally-oriented Master programme developed by leading European universities. The full programme is scheduled to be launched in October 2006 - this is later than originally planned, but is necessary due to unharmonised educational legislation. Meanwhile individual modules will be offered each term. The partners participating in the European Master in Translation are:

  • Handelshøjskolen i Århus/Aarhus School of Business (Aarhus, Denmark)
  • Heriot Watt University (Edinburgh, Scotland)
  • Universidad Pontifica Comillas de Madrid (Madrid, Spain)
  • Université de Mons-Hainaut (Mons, Belgium)

European Studies With Translation Studies MSc/Diploma - Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh

Entry Requirements A good Honours Degree (or its equivalent) from a British or overseas university in a relevant discipline. In addition to this candidates for European Studies with Economic Integration should be able to demonstrate an intermediate understanding of economics. Candidates should be able to demonstrate degree-level competence in French, German, Greek or Spanish.

Duration 12 months for MSc; 9 months for Diploma.

The School of Management and Languages, building on international research and teaching expertise in cultural studies, economics, history, politics and translating studies, has recently launched the MSc/Diploma programmes in European Studies.

These programmes aim to equip students with a critical, interdisciplinary understanding of Europe as well as highly developed analytical skills which will enable them to pursue careers in a variety of sectors (e.g. European and international organizations, NGOs, public and private sector) and/or undertake further research in the field of European studies.

All three programmes include a common core of two dedicated courses, namely Cultures, Identities and Citizenship in Europe and Governance, Democracy and Political Transition in Europe, which together account for over half the learning experience. In addition, students will opt for one of three “specialisations”, Economic Integration, Political Integration or Translation Studies, by following courses in these areas.

EUROPEAN STUDIES WITH TRANSLATION STUDIES
In addition to the two core courses, students will study Translation and Interpreting Studies and one of the following translation seminars: French into English; English into French; German into English; English into German; Greek into English; English into Greek; Spanish into English; English into Spanish.


Translating And Conference Interpreting MSc/Diploma - Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh

Entry Requirements Strand A – native command of English plus near-native command of, and a good degree or equivalent in one of: French, German, Greek, Spanish, or vice versa; Strand B – native command of English plus a good degree or equivalent in two of: French, German, Greek, Spanish.

Duration The Diploma courses last 9 months (October-June); students attaining a prescribed level of performance may proceed to the MSc (a further 3-6 months) by Dissertation.

Languages offered are French, German, Greek and Spanish. Students of Translating and Conference Interpreting and Translation and Technology work in both directions between English and one European Language (Strand A), or into English from two European languages (Strand B). Students of Translating and Public Service Interpreting follow Strand A.

These full-time courses are designed to provide graduate linguists with a broad grounding in the specialist skills of translating and interpreting as a platform for a variety of professional careers. They cover the following activities/subjects:
Translating
Conference and Liaison Interpreting
Public Service Interpreting (legal domain)
Revising, Editing, Summarising and Proof-Reading
Technology and Translation
Translation and Interpreting Studies
European Integration Studies
MSc Dissertation.
All students follow a common first term of study after which they decide whether to specialise in conference interpreting, translation and technology or public service interpreting.


Translating And Public Service Interpreting MSc/Diploma - Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh

Entry Requirements Strand A – native command of English plus near-native command of, and a good degree or equivalent in one of: French, German, Greek, Spanish, or vice versa; Strand B – native command of English plus a good degree or equivalent in two of: French, German, Greek, Spanish.

Duration The Diploma courses last 9 months (October-June); students attaining a prescribed level of performance may proceed to the MSc (a further 3-6 months) by Dissertation.

Languages offered are French, German, Greek and Spanish. Students of Translating and Conference Interpreting and Translation and Technology work in both directions between English and one European Language (Strand A), or into English from two European languages (Strand B). Students of Translating and Public Service Interpreting follow Strand A.

These full-time courses are designed to provide graduate linguists with a broad grounding in the specialist skills of translating and interpreting as a platform for a variety of professional careers. They cover the following activities/subjects:
Translating
Conference and Liaison Interpreting
Public Service Interpreting (legal domain)
Revising, Editing, Summarising and Proof-Reading
Technology and Translation
Translation and Interpreting Studies
European Integration Studies
MSc Dissertation
All students follow a common first term of study after which they decide whether to specialise in conference interpreting, translation and technology or public service interpreting.


Translation And Technology MSc/Diploma - Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh

Entry Requirements Strand A – native command of English plus near-native command of, and a good degree or equivalent in one of: French, German, Greek, Spanish, or vice versa; Strand B – native command of English plus a good degree or equivalent in two of: French, German, Greek, Spanish.

Duration The Diploma courses last 9 months (October-June); students attaining a prescribed level of performance may proceed to the MSc (a further 3-6 months) by Dissertation.

Languages offered are French, German, Greek and Spanish. Students of Translating and Conference Interpreting and Translation and Technology work in both directions between English and one European Language (Strand A), or into English from two European languages (Strand B). Students of Translating and Public Service Interpreting follow Strand A.

These full-time courses are designed to provide graduate linguists with a broad grounding in the specialist skills of translating and interpreting as a platform for a variety of professional careers. They cover the following activities/subjects:
Translating
Conference and Liaison Interpreting
Public Service Interpreting (legal domain)
Revising, Editing, Summarising and Proof-Reading
Technology and Translation
Translation and Interpreting Studies
European Integration Studies
MSc Dissertation
All students follow a common first term of study after which they decide whether to specialise in conference interpreting, translation and technology or public service interpreting.


MA in Interpreting and translating - University of Bath

INTRODUCTION
The MA in Interpreting and Translating is a one-year, full-time programme which aims to prepare linguists for careers as interpreters and/or translators. It is open to graduates, and students expecting to graduate during the current academic year, who show that they have the required linguistic aptitude.

As from 2005-2006 the MA programme in Interpreting and Translating will also include special, tailor-made English training courses. These courses are designed for all non-EU students whose mother tongue is not English. For further information >>

COURSE STRUCTURE
The programme is taught over two semesters with examinations in the summer. Students may follow one of two possible paths:

PATH 1 allows students with English as their first or "A" language to offer two other languages, from Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian and Spanish, working into English.

PATH 2 allows students whose first or "A" language is Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian or Spanish to work in both directions between that language and English, OR allows students with English as their first or "A" language to work between that and one of the foreign languages listed.

Not all language combinations will necessarily be available every year, according to demand.


MA in Translations & Professional Language Skills - University of Bath

Introduction
This one-year programme is designed to prepare linguists for careers in several areas of specialised language work in which there is a rapidly growing demand for highly trained speakers of English, both in the UK and abroad.

These areas include liaison interpreting, translation, précis-writing, editing and revision, and proofreading. The programme will also cover important enterprise skills such as translation management and setting up in business.

The programme is an entirely vocational one which is aimed at channelling students into jobs. It caters for students whose first or "A" language is English and who can work from at least one of the European languages taught in the Department. Applications are welcome from students who have taken a first degree that combines a language with another subject (e.g. economics, law, business studies, etc.)

Course Structure
The languages currently offered by the Department for this programme are French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish. Suitably qualified students must offer at least one of these languages.

All students take the core units in translation (in all the languages they are offering), editing and revision and liaison interpreting (in one language). Translation and editing and revision are offered in both semesters. Liaison iInterpreting is offered only in semester 1. Further units are chosen to make up the required number of credits for the programme.

A range of non-assessed extra-curricular units will also be available, covering such topics such as economics, international law and the EU institutions. These units are shared with the MA in Interpreting and Translating.

At the end of semester 2, students start work on their dissertation, which they have until 30 September to complete.

Course Content
Core units
All students take the following core units:-

Professional translation - both semesters (Trains students in the skills and techniques required by translators in the professional world)

Editing and revision - both semesters (Focuses on developing students’ awareness of style, register and usage, with a view to producing clear and concise English texts)

Liaison interpreting - first semester only (Realistic, face-to-face interpreting with the emphasis on frequently encountered scenarios)

Optional units
All the optional units are for a single semester.

Précis writing for the UN - Semester 2

Proofreading - Semester 1

Translation management - Semester 1

Enterprise skills for linguists - Enterprise skills for linguists

Additional translation - Semester 2

Public service interpreting - Semester 2

Extra-Curricular Units
A variety of extra-curricular units are offered, designed to provide students with background knowledge that will underpin their language-related work. These include:

Approaches to professional work

Elements of English law

Introduction to economics

Law of the EU

Basic international law

The institutions of the European Union

Students who wish to proceed to the MA must submit a 15,000 word dissertation after successful completion of the taught section of the programme.

MA in Translation Studies

University Fast Find Site Index Schools / Departments Telephone Directory Email Directory Useful Contacts Frequently Asked Questions Directions / Maps Acronym Directory Vacancies MA IN TRANSLATION STUDIES - University of Birmingham

Birmingham-based Programmes:
- FAQ and General Info
- MA in TEFL/TESL
- Applied Linguistics
- Special Applications of Linguistics
- English for Specific Purposes
- Translation Studies
- Language and Lexicography
- Applied Corpus Linguistics
- Corpus Linguistics
- Critical Discourse, Culture and Communication

- Open Distance Learning
- Research Degrees
- Study at CELS

Other Links
- Other Degrees in English
- Humanities Postgraduate pages
- University Postgraduate Prospectus

Why choose Translation Studies?
The MA in Translation Studies is designed for practising translators, linguists, and anyone interested in translation as an area of study. The long term goals of the course are to enable you to develop an understanding of current theoretical thinking on translation and linguistic theory, in particular as it relates to the practice of translation, and to improve your translating skills.

Structure
Students on the MA in Translation Studies take six taught modules, three in the September-December term and three more in the January-March term. The modules are described below. Students also write a 12,000 word dissertation.

Module 1: Describing Language (20 credits)
This incorporates elements of lexis and grammar. Grammar will be studied from a Systemic-Functional perspective. The module deals primarily with the linguistics of English.
Module 2: Introduction to Translation Research (20 credits)
This introduces the main significant aspects of translation in terms of theory and practice. General issues are discussed by drawing on key areas in linguistic and textual analysis. The process and product of translations are considered in relation to social and cultural contexts.
Module 3: either
Social and Psychological Aspects of Language
This module includes courses on both Sociolinguistics and Psycholinguistics. Students look at issues of language in society, focusing on the linguistic and political implications of language variation and languages in contact. In Psycholinguistics, they are introduced to the study of first and second language acquisition and cognitive models of language.
or

Discourse Culture and Communication
This module covers aspects of how spoken and written discourse is organised, how it varies, and how it may be described and analysed. There is a strong focus on issues of culture and ideology underlying communication.

Module 4: Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (20 credits)
This module includes a course in methods and approaches to research in Applied Linguistics. In addition, students select one option from the range on offer and apply what they have learned to a small research project
Module 5: Advanced Translation Studies (20 credits)
This continues work started in Module 2, focusing on current theoretical thinking within Translation Studies. Students explore the role and position of translation (and translators) in processes of identity construction, language planning, in the spread of political and religious ideologies, etc.
Module 6: Translation Workshop (20 credits)
This focuses on technological applications of translation, taking a number of languages as examples.
Dissertation Under the guidance of a supervisor, students produce a 12,000 word dissertation on an area of translation of their own choosing. The dissertation carries 60 credits. Click here for a list of completed MA theses.

Introduction to the Bank of English and improving Academic English
In addition, there are two non-assessed components in the programme. All students take a short course - Introduction to the Bank of English - which introduces them to the 400 million word Cobuild Bank of English corpus, an invaluable collection of authentic language data against which theory, intuition and pedagogic materials can be measured. Students who have not previously been educated through the medium of English also have the opportunity to take a course in Academic English.


The MA Translation Studies is also available in distance mode.
MA in Interpreting and Translating - University of Bradford MA in Interpreting and Translating for International Business - University of Bradford

Outline Syllabus
Core modules include Conference interpreting (consecutive, liaison and simultaneous), Interpreting Skills, Translation (basic, intermediate and advanced), Summarising and précis-writing techniques. Optional modules include Advanced English (for non-native speakers) and Ab initio 'accession' language (e.g. Polish).
All students take basic and intermediate courses in interpreting and translating. In the second semester students from Pathway A may select from two to four advanced options in either interpreting or translating, or combinations of both. Other students select options offered in the area of social sciences and humanities.
During the Easter vacation students may have the opportunity to complete a period of practical work experience, arranged by the Department, attached to the language service of an international organization, government department or multinational firm. Placement provision is limited and cannot be guaranteed.


Diploma/MA in Translation - University of Bristol

The Diploma/MA is currently available for French into English only.

The Diploma programme gives language graduates the opportunity to acquire a qualification which will facilitate their entry to the translating profession. It may also be suitable for practising translators who do not have, but wish to gain, formal qualifications.

This course is unusual, and perhaps unique, in taking place at weekends and therefore suiting people in full-time employment who wish for a career change.

Students who successfully complete the programme may choose to enter for the Institute of Linguists' Diploma in Translation; they may also opt to take an additional unit to upgrade their qualification to MA.

Content
YEAR ONE
60 Credits

Unit 1. Theory and Practice of Translation (10 credits)

(a) theory of translation

(b) translation techniques
Unit 2. Analysis of Text and Vocabulary (10 credits)

(a) text analysis

(b) terminology/ lexicography
Unit 3. General Translation I (20 credits)

Unit 4. Semi-specialised Translation I (20 credits)
YEAR TWO
60 credits

Unit 5. General Translation II (20 credits)

Unit 6. Semi-specialised Translation II (20 credits)

Unit 7. The Translator's Expertise (10 credits)

(a) subject expertise

(b) introduction to interpreting
Unit 8. The Translator's Business (10 credits)

(a) business practice

(b) information technology

Duration
Two years' part-time study (six terms) for the Diploma. Students whose marks consistently average 60% or above over the two-year Diploma course may be offered the opportunity of upgrading their qualification to an MA by taking an additional translation unit over eight months (two terms).

Assessment
Continuous assessment of each unit by written assignments and/or oral testing. Written examinations and an in vivo interpreting test.

Entry requirements
Candidates must hold, or expect to hold, a good Honours Degree or equivalent in French and be native speakers of English. Applicants without formal qualifications who can demonstrate that their linguistic abilities are at an appropriate level will also be considered. Admission to the course is normally by interview.

Further information
Judith Hurley
Diploma/MA in Translation
Department of French,
19 Woodland Road
Bristol BS8 1TE

MA in Applied Translation Studies - University of East Anglia(UEA)

The MA in Applied Translation Studies at UEA is designed as an academic qualification for prospective or practising professional translators. It responds to the current high market demand for translators, providing graduates with a deepened insight into the process of translation and into the nature of language. It is also an ideal basis for further postgraduate research in Translation Studies or Applied Linguistics. The MA complements the School's established and highly successful MA in Literary Translation, but focuses on translation for academic, political, industrial and commercial purposes.

Key features of the MA in Applied Translation Studies at UEA:
Two semesters of taught units plus a supervised dissertation
Core units: technological tools, translation theory and research methods
Full-time (one year) and part-time (two-year) programmes
Options include: translation work experience, literary translation, and units in linguistics
Practical translation work between English and one or more languages of your choice
Translation Workshops led by distinguished, practising literary and commercial translators

LLT offers an outstanding research environment in the field of Translation Studies: UEA is home to the British Centre for Literary Translation, several members of Faculty are distinguished translators, and UEA's journal Norwich Papers often publishes students' work. Funding for the MA may be available from translation companies and awarding bodies

MA in Literary Translation - University of East Anglia(UEA)

This programme is designed to provide an academic qualification for those intending to become (or who already are) professional translators. There are no other few taught courses in Literary Translation in the UK, which, like UEA's programme, both contain a large practical component and have a strong emphasis on stylistic and cultural issues. The course comprises a series of workshops on a range of topics by professional translators as well as the core units on Process and Product in Translation, Stylistics, and Translation Theory. Lectures and Seminars run by the British Centre for Literary Translation are also available to students. Students receive advice on approaching publishers and have the opportunity to work on our journal Norwich Papers, which is produced entirely by the students.

Students may work with any languages, as long as these include English. We have specialists in many languages in the school as well as a range of external assessors.

Besides attending classes, students write a 15,000 to 20,000 word dissertation, which may take the form either of a translation with commentary or a critical essay, and is written under the supervision of a member of faculty.

Students embarking upon this course will normally hold a degree (class 2.i or above), though concessions may be made on an individual basis for students from abroad or for practising translators who have already published a substantial body of work.

Compulsory Units

Process and Product in Translation
Translation Theory
Stylistics

MA in Literature: Translation and Comparative Literature - University of Essex

To follow this route, students will take LT916 in the autumn term (alongside the MA core course), will take at least one further course from those listed below in the spring term, and will write a dissertation on a translation and/or comparative literature topic.
LT916 Literary Translation and Comparative Literature
LT918 Creative Perspectives on Translation
LT928 Adaptation
Applicants should be fluent in English and have a good reading knowledge of at least one other language. (Refresher courses in some modern European languages are offered by the Department of Language and Linguistics. Further information is available on request.)

LT916 Literary Translation and Comparative Literature - Course Description
This course will provide a forum to introduce and discuss some of the main issues current in Translation Studies today. Particular attention will be paid to an assessment of the place and function of literary translation within the wider field of Comparative Literature. Students on the course will look at different procedures that have been adopted in translating literary works from various periods and genres and will discuss some of the ways in which cultural continuities and discontinuties have affected transmission of texts from one milieu to another.

LT918 Perspectives On Translation - Course Description
This module has two main objectives. It is designed to introduce students to a range of issues concerned with the relationship between "creativity" and "translation" and to allow scope for identifying and discussing the practical problems encountered in producing versions of literary texts. A study of specific examples of individual and collaborative transposition, where students are encouraged to present their own work of creative translation, will complete the module.

LT928 Adaptation - Course Description
This course will look at adaptation and issues of textual change from a variety of perspectives, that is, changes which occur internally between texts (translations, literary rewrites), and changes which occur from one medium to another (film and stage adaptations, cinematic remakes). In order to explore on a comparative basis differences, for instance, between artistic influence, authorial fidelity, homage, appropriation, feminist reclaiming and plagiarism, the course will focus in particular on the recyclings of mythic, legendary, historical, literary figures and monsters in a variety of texts and media.

Coursework and dissertation guidelines:

No more than one assignment, plus dissertation, should fall within a single category as defined below. In other words, you are expected to demonstrate a range and variety of approaches to the work that you submit. Students may wish to attempt one piece of collaborative coursework during the year, but please see the course supervisor for approval of topic and approach to a joint-working method. Any assignment or dissertation that includes substantial translation into a language outside the linguistic competence of those teaching on the course will be subject to normal marking practices, but will additionally be submitted to a qualified reader for scrutiny and comment. Any student wishing to produce a translation and commentary for the dissertation must have followed at least LT916 and LT918.

Literary Translation with Commentary
- any translation undertaken by the student should be limited as a maximum to 60% of the word count of the work submitted.
Critical Work involving substantial Translation
- 'substantial' is understood to mean amounting to at least 20% of the total word count and contributing centrally to the primary function of the work.
Discussion of a single target-language (TL) Text
- this should be informed by a theoretical or cultural awareness of key issues.
Comparison of two or more TL texts.
Theoretical, Historical or Cultural Essay on Translation or a Comparative Literary topic.
Work on Comparative Literature without a translation component to it.


MA Translation Studies - University of Hull

Translation Studies has witnessed unparalleled growth over the course of the last ten years. The world market in translation, already thought to be worth in excess of 10 billion pounds a year, barely satisfies a fraction of the demand for translation created by a global economy. Translation Studies has also pioneered a number of key ideas and concepts which have proved themselves invaluable with regard to the study of cultural exchange in areas as diverse as literature, poetry and drama, history, media, law, comparative religion, philosophy, and the social sciences.

The MA/Diploma programme at Hull is intended to open new avenues of thought while providing a firm foundation in the discipline of Translation Studies. With its equal emphasis on the practical aspects of the translation process and the underlying theoretical issues involved, the programme will be of interest to all graduate linguists whatever their future career route: commercial or technical translation; literary or stage translation; research, teaching or management.

This is a one-year, full-time programme (or two years, part-time). Students pursue four core (compulsory) modules and two optional modules over the course of two semesters (September-January; February-May). This is followed by a period of work on your dissertation (or equivalent annotated translation) which you can submit in September.

MA Translation Studies: Programme details
Admissions
Programme details
Staff
Useful links
The programme begins in September at the beginning of the academic session. It lasts 12 months and includes two teaching semesters and a dissertation period over the summer following the second teaching semester.
Full-time students take 3 modules in each teaching semester and complete a dissertation project in the final stage of the programme.
Modules
In the first semester you will take three modules, either two or three of these will be core modules depending on your language background. All students take the following two modules:
An Introduction to Linguistics for Translators
This module helps students understand how texts actually work. Among the subjects explored are how writers use lexis and grammar to create certain effects, how texts are organised, and the features which distinguish one variety of written text from another.
Translation Technologies
Here students are introduced to the various advances that have been made in software design in recent years with regard to automatic and semi-automatic translation programmes. We explore the advantages and shortcomings of specific packages, and examine the application of other electronic and online resources from information retrieval to desktop publishing. This module also enables students to develop the practical skills required of a translator with regard to producing finished texts: copy-editing, revision, and self-revision.
Postgraduate English for Academic Purposes
International students with IELTS scores less than 7.0 take this module as a requirement. However we recommend that all our international students on the programme take advantage of this module which has been designed specifically for the international students taking this Translation Studies programme.
Semester 2
There is a wide variety of optional modules available in the second semester including online modules and modules in creative writing.
There are also a number of modules designed specifically for the Translation Studies programme and available only to our students:
Practical Translation Skills
Students are provided with extensive hands-on experience of translation practices with reference to a wide variety of texts ranging from poetry, prose fiction, and subtitling to technical reports, journalism, and advertising. The emphasis throughout this module will be finding the necessary balance between the scientific study of language and the inherent creativity of translation process itself. Issues in Translation Studies This module examines the different theories which have been put forward to account for not only how we translate but what we translate. In both cases, translation will be seen as the product of massive, and sometimes contradictory, cultural, social and political forces. Among the issues studied will be gender and translation, translation and post-colonialism, translation and power, and translation and the media.
Language Transfer in Media and Film
This popular option looks at a variety of language issues in visual media, including film subtitling.
After successful completion of the six modules taken in the first two semesters, you will be eligible to graduate with a Diploma in Translation Studies or to continue to the Masters stage and prepare a dissertation.
The Dissertation:
The dissertation is a research-based activity which involves the preparation of a 15,000 word dissertation or an annotated translation of approximately 15,000 words. You work in close consultation with a personal supervisor. The dissertation project offers you an opportunity to develop your knowledge in any area of Translation Studies, including subtitling; literary and stage translation (we can offer specialist supervision in virtually every area and period from Greek and Roman classical theatre and Medieval Vernacular Languages through to contemporary Dutch detective fiction and translating/adapting for television, film or radio); comparative cultural studies; scientific, commercial, legal, or technical translation; project management; or the application of new technologies to the translation process.


MA/Diploma in Translation Studies - Univerity of Hull

Translation Studies is a discipline which has witnessed unparalleled growth over the course of the last ten years. One reason for this is the fact that the world market in translation, already thought to be worth in excess of 10 billion pounds a year, barely satisfies a fraction of the demand created by a global economy. Another equally valid reason is that Translation Studies has pioneered a number of key ideas and concepts which have proved themselves invaluable with regard to the study of cultural exchange in areas as diverse as literature, poetry and drama, history, media, law, comparative religion, philosophy, and the social sciences.

The MA/Diploma programme at Hull is intended to open new avenues of thought while providing a firm foundation in the discipline of Translation Studies. With its equal emphasis on the practical aspects of the translation process and the underlying theoretical issues involved, the programme will be of interest to all graduate linguists whatever their future career route: commercial or technical translation; literary or stage translation; research, teaching or management.

This is a one-year, full-time programme (or two years, part-time). Students pursue four core (compulsory) modules and two optional modules over the course of two semesters (September-January; February-May). This is followed by a period of work on your dissertation (or equivalent annotated translation), which you can submit in September.

In the first semester, the core modules are:

• An Introduction to Linguistics for Translators, which helps students understand how texts actually work. Among the subjects explored are how writers use lexis and grammar to create certain effects, how texts are organised, and the features which distinguish one variety of written text from another.

• An Introduction to New Technologies, which introduces students to the various advances which have been made in software design in recent years with regard to automatic and semi-automatic translation programmes, explores the advantages and shortcomings of specific packages, and examines the application of other electronic and online resources from information retrieval to desktop publishing. This module also enables students to develop the practical skills required of a translator with regard to producing finished texts: copy-editing, revision, and self-revision.

In the second semester, the core modules are as follows:

• Practical Translation Skills provides students with extensive hands-on experience of translation practices with reference to a wide variety of texts ranging from poetry, prose fiction, and subtitling to technical reports, journalism, and advertising. The emphasis throughout this module will be on finding the necessary balance between the scientific study of language and the inherent creativity of translation process itself.

• Issues in Translation Studies examines the different theories which have been put forward to account for not only how we translate but what we translate. In both cases, translation will be seen as the product of massive, and sometimes contradictory, cultural, social and political forces. Among the issues studied will be gender and translation, translation and post-colonialism, translation and power, and translation and the media.

• Options. Students will be counselled with regard to their choice of options from a wide selection of postgraduate modules available in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. For those seeking a professional career route into technical, commercial or scientific translation, for example, it will be possible to enhance your linguistic skills in a second or third language. The languages currently offered by the Faculty include French, German, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Danish, and Swedish.

• Dissertation. Given the nature of the translation process and the way in which research is conducted, written examinations are by no means an ideal way of assessing progress. Indeed, most assessment is conducted throughout the programme by means of written assignments and short specialised translation projects. This research-based activity continues as you prepare your dissertation (or an equivalent annotated translation) in close consultation with your supervisor. This is your opportunity to develop your knowledge in any area of Translation Studies, including interpreting and subtitling; literary and stage translation (we can offer specialist supervision in virtually every area and period from Greek and Roman classical theatre and Medieval Vernacular Languages through to contemporary Dutch detective fiction and translating/adapting for television, film or radio); comparative cultural studies; scientific, commercial, legal, or technical translation; project management; or the application of new technologies to the translation process.

If you would like more information on the MA/Diploma in Translation Studies, please contact

Dr Terry Hale
Programme Director, MA in Translation Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences,
University of Hull,
Hull HU6 7RX, UK
Tel. +44(0)1482 465615
Fax. +44(0)1482 466210
Email t.j.hale@hull.ac.uk


MPhil/PhD in Translation Studies - Univerity of Hull

We also have the research degrees of MPhil and PhD in Translation Studies. Enquiries are welcome, and should be addressed to Dr Terry Hale, as above.


Applied Translation Studies MA - University of Leeds

This flexible programme offers you the opportunity to develop the high-level translation and project management skills which you will need as a practising translator. Specialising in translation, you will take core modules and chosen options designed to equip you with the wide range of skills that employers are looking for. The wide choice of subjects available allows you to tailor the programme to suit your particular interests and strengths.

Duration
12 months full-time; 24 months part-time

Entry requirements
English Language req: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) Paper based test - an overall score of at least 550 (with 4.0 in the Test of Written English (TWE) Computer based test - an overall score of at least 220 (with 4.0 in essay writing) IELTS (International English Language Testing System) An overall score of at least 6.0 (with not less than 5.5 in listening and reading and not less than 5.0 in speaking and writing) Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English Grades A, B or C Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English Grades A or B Degree from an English-speaking university You must have completed at least the final two years of a first degree at an English-speaking university. Academic entry req: A good first degree (Honours 2:1 or above, or the equivalent) and an excellent command of foreign languages. Exceptionally, candidates with equivalent qualifications or experience will be considered.

Admissions contact
Graduate School Office
Tel: +44 (0) 113 343 3234
E-mail: smlcpg@leeds.ac.uk

School of Modern Languages and Cultures
The Univerity of Leeds has long been acknowledged as a major British centre for the study of foreign languages and cultures. Its language departments are grouped within the federal School of Modern Languages and Cultures (SMLC) which forms part of the Research Faculty of Arts. The School incorporates the seven foreign language departments: Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies, East Asian Studies, French, German, Italian, Russian and Slavonic Studies, Spanish and Portuguese, the Department of Linguistics and Phonetics and the University Language Centre’s Foreign Language Teaching Unit and English Language Unit. The School registers around 160 postgraduates each year on a variety of taught MA and research programmes; a number of scholarships for both research and taught postgraduate study are provided by the School and by the University.

The School boasts its own IT facility, the Electronic Resources and Information Centre, providing state-of-the-art multilingual software, including the sophisticated translation software which forms a core element of the MA in Applied Translation Studies.

Academic staff in the SMLC pursue a varied range of research, covering, each within their specific language or linguistic discipline, the fields of language, translation studies, literature, history, politics, economics, sociology, cultural studies, film and media studies. Applications for research degree study in any of these areas are warmly welcomed.

What you study
Compulsory modules:
-Computer-Assisted Translation
-Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies
-Specialised Translation into English (1 or 2 languages)
-Summer project - either Extended Translations or Dissertation

Optional modules:
Students may choose from CTS optional modules, including:
-Introduction to Screen Translation
-Corpus Linguistics for Translators
-Principles and Applications of Machine Translation
-Technical Communication for Translators: Software Documentation
-Specialised Translation out of English

Alternatively, students may choose from a wide range of elective modules offered by other areas of the University, including additional languages and topics in Linguistics.


Interpreting and Translation Studies MA - University of Leeds

The programme will provide linguists with the opportunity to develop the skills of professional interpreting and translating and consolidate these skills by acquiring familiarity with a wide range of issues in the field of international affairs, politics, international business and science and technology. It will also provide an introduction to translation theory and research methods.

Duration
12 months full-time

Entry requirements
English language requirements: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) Paper based test - an overall score of at least 550 (with 4.0 in the Test of Written English (TWE) Computer based test - an overall score of at least 220 (with 4.0 in essay writing) IELTS (International English Language Testing System) An overall score of at least 6.0 (with not less than 5.5 in listening and reading and not less than 5.0 in speaking and writing) Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English Grades A, B or C Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English Grades A or B Degree from an English-speaking university You must have completed at least the final two years of a first degree at an English-speaking university. Academic entry requirements: A good first degree (Honours 2:1 or above, or the equivalent) and an excellent command of foreign languages. Exceptionally, candidates with equivalent qualifications or experience will be considered.

Admissions contact
Graduate School Office
Tel: +44 (0) 113 343 3234
E-mail: smlcpg@leeds.ac.uk

School of Modern Languages and Cultures
The Univerity of Leeds has long been acknowledged as a major British centre for the study of foreign languages and cultures. Its language departments are grouped within the federal School of Modern Languages and Cultures (SMLC) which forms part of the Research Faculty of Arts. The School incorporates the seven foreign language departments: Arabic and Middle Eastern Studies, East Asian Studies, French, German, Italian, Russian and Slavonic Studies, Spanish and Portuguese, the Department of Linguistics and Phonetics and the University Language Centre’s Foreign Language Teaching Unit and English Language Unit. The School registers around 160 postgraduates each year on a variety of taught MA and research programmes; a number of scholarships for both research and taught postgraduate study are provided by the School and by the University.

The School boasts its own IT facility, the Electronic Resources and Information Centre, providing state-of-the-art multilingual software, including the sophisticated translation software which forms a core element of the MA in Applied Translation Studies.

Academic staff in the SMLC pursue a varied range of research, covering, each within their specific language or linguistic discipline, the fields of language, translation studies, literature, history, politics, economics, sociology, cultural studies, film and media studies. Applications for research degree study in any of these areas are warmly welcomed.

What you study
Compulsory modules:
-Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies
-Specialised Translation into English (1 or 2 languages)
-Consecutive and Bilateral Interpreting (1 or 2 languages)
-Simultaneous Interpreting (1 or 2 languages)
-Summer project - either Extended Translations or Dissertation
-English for Interpreters (non-native speakers of English)

Optional modules:
Students may choose from CTS optional modules, including:
-Computers and the Translator
-Introduction to Screen Translation
-Corpus Linguistics for Translators
-Principles and Applications of Machine Translation
-Technical Communication for Translators: Software Documentation
-Specialised Translation out of English

Alternatively, students may choose from a wide range of elective modules offered by other areas of the University, including additional languages and topics in Linguistics.


Screen Translation Studies MA - University of Leeds

With a growing demand across the visual media for highly-qualified linguists capable of subtitling for foreign-language viewers or for the hard of hearing, this programme will familiarise you with the linguistic, cultural and technical challenges of screen translation, dubbing and subtitling. Specialising in screen translation, you will produce your own translations and subtitles using professional software, following a programme of core and optional modules.

Duration
12 months full-time; 24 months part-time

Entry requirements
English language requirements: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) Paper based test - an overall score of at least 550 (with 4.0 in the Test of Written English (TWE) Computer based test - an overall score of at least 220 (with 4.0 in essay writing) IELTS (International English Language Testing System) An overall score of at least 6.0 (with not less than 5.5 in listening and reading and not less than 5.0 in speaking and writing) Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English Grades A, B or C Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English Grades A or B Degree from an English-speaking university You must have completed at least the final two years of a first degree at an English-speaking university. Academic entry requirements: A good first degree (Honours 2:1 or above, or the equivalent) and an excellent command of foreign languages. Exceptionally, candidates with equivalent qualifications or experience will be considered.

Admissions contact
SMLC Graduate School Office
Tel: +44 (0) 113 343 3234
E-mail: smlcpg@leeds.ac.uk

Centre for Translation Studies
The Centre for Translation Studies, in the School of Modern Languages and Cultures, has an internationally-recognised reputation for excellence. Our specialist team of academics and professional practitioners trains students to translate or interpret between English and 11 other languages, and provides essential study pathways for professional linguists in a wide range of sectors.

With the growing demands of global multilingual e-commerce, the enlargement of the EU, and community language rights presenting ever new challenges, the need for highly-trained translators and interpreters has never been greater.

At the Centre for Translation Studies we offer graduates from diverse backgrounds the chance to become highly-qualified professionals with much sought-after linguistic and technological skills.

Our portfolio of vocationally-oriented postgraduate programmes are all supported by professional-quality facilities and contributions from experienced practitioners.

The Centre is active in two major projects funded by the European Union’s Leonardo programme. It coordinates eCoLoRe (http://ecolore.leeds.ac.uk) and is a core partner in MeLLANGE (http://mellange.eila.jussieu.fr/) , both projects delivering resources for training in the use of the latest translation tools.

The Centre has also obtained a major grant from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to develop a ‘semantic assistant’ to help translators find suitable translations for difficult expressions.

What you study
Compulsory modules:
-Text Compression and Monolingual Subtitling
-Audio-Visual Text Analysis
-Film Translation and Subtitling
-Methods and Approaches in Translation Studies
-Specialised Translation into English (1 or 2 languages)
-Summer project either Extended Translations or Dissertation

Optional modules:
Students may choose from CTS optional modules, including:
-Corpus Linguistics for Translators
-Principles and Applications of Machine Translation
-Technical Communication for Translators: Software Documentation

Alternatively, students may choose from a wide range of elective modules offered by other areas of the University, including additional languages and topics in Linguistics.


MA IN TRANSLATION STUDIES - University of Manchester

The MA in Translation Studies at Manchester combines theory with practice and offers a number of specialist streams. The MA is not limited to specific language pairs - you translate into or out of English and another language of your choice. Our MA students come from Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America; each year ten or more different languages are spoken by the MA group - a truly multilingual environment in the centre of Manchester!

All prospective students are invited to attend the
School Postgraduate Open Day
on Wednesday 8 February 2006.
Further details and online registration

Here you'll find further information about the MA

The MA programme structure
The Posgraduate Diploma
Part-time study
Admission requirements
Funding and fees
A selection of recent MA dissertations
Applying for the MA/PG Diploma in Translation Studies

Programme structure

Core courses on translation and interpreting studies and research methods provide a context for studying translation methods and strategies. These account for 60 credits. Specialisations are offered with practical and theoretical components, accounting for another 60 credits. You can choose all your options from translation studies specialisations, or combine these specialisations with other related courses in the School (e.g. on cinema, literature, culture, linguistics)

Translation studies options are available in:
Audiovisual translation
Technical and commercial translation
Translation of religious texts
Literary translation
Cross-cultural pragmatics
Translating for international organizations
Case studies in Chinese-English, English-Chinese translation
Translation in the Arab world
The programme commences in late September. You follow lectures and seminars in Semesters 1 and 2 (September-January and February-April), and work on a research or translation dissertation which you submit in early September.

Postgraduate Diploma

A Postgraduate Diploma is awarded to students who successfully complete the taught component of the MA course (i.e. modules in Semester 1 and 2), but who do not write a dissertation. The entry requirements and pass marks for Diploma are lower than for MA.

Part-time study

It is possible to do the MA or Diploma on a part-time basis by spreading the workload over two years instead of one. However, this still requires day-time attendance; we do not offer evening courses or courses by correspondence at the moment. If you are interested in a two-week summer course on research methods in translation studies, please consult the Translation Research Summer School pages.

Admission requirements

You will normally have attained an upper second class honours (or equivalent) or higher in a relevant subject, such as language, literature or linguistics. You should have an excellent knowledge of English and one other language. If your first degree has not been studied in English, you will normally have to reach a required standard in an international English language examination such as IELTS (7.0 points, including a 7.0 for the writing component) or TOEFL (600 points). If you hold your degree in other fields, you can be considered for the MA if you can demonstrate the required competence in English and one other language.

Funding and fees

External funding from AHRC

The AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council) offers studentships for postgraduate translation and interpreting courses in the UK. Eligible students are UK and EU citizens who have or are completing an appropriate first degree and have attained or are expecting to attain a 1st class mark. In addition you must meet the English language entry qualifications for the MA (in the case of non-UK students) and you should not already hold an MA degree. UK citizens may apply for fees and a maintenance award. EU citizens apply for the fees element only. CTIS and the University of Manchester will support applications from suitable candidates. The application process needs to be started by February to meet the deadlines. The University of Manchester sets a deadline of mid-March for receipt of completed AHRC forms. For more information consult the AHRC web site (Postgraduate Awards) to download application forms and instructions


Postgraduate Programmes in Translating and Interpreting (T&I) - Chinese/English & Japanese/English - University of Newcastle Upon Tyne

We are the only School in the UK to provide a complete suite of translating and interpreting degrees starting from a Diploma in Translating, which leads on to an MA with four distinctive pathways (in Translating; Interpreting; Translating and Interpreting; and Translation Studies). The MAs can culminate in an Integrated PhD in the field of translating and interpreting.

Find out more about:

Course Structure

The course is a two-year Postgraduate Programme in Translating and Interpreting. It consists of a common first year leading to the Graduate Diploma in Translating, followed by another year of study leading to the MA. In the MA year, you are able to follow one of four pathways: the more professionally-oriented MA in Interpreting, MA in Translating, or MA in Translating and Interpreting; or the more academically-oriented MA in Translation Studies. Your choice of pathway depends on your own interest and on your performance in the first year.

The programme provides professional competence in translating and/or interpreting. It provides a balance between theory and practice and prepares you for meeting the stringent demands of the job market. At present the we offer courses in Chinese and Japanese as working languages into and out of English. We aim to develop a Korean language strand.

The programme is of 9 months' duration for the Diploma, and 12 months for the MA, full time, both beginning in mid-September. If you take the MA in the year immediately following the Diploma, you will have the period June to September free, either to return home, or to travel elsewhere in Europe to practise your languages and experience other western cultures. For some students it may be possible to arrange work placements where you can practise translation or interpreting.

We also offer high-class facilities within the School. These include:

an interpreting suite
a translating and interpreting resource room
You can also study translating and interpreting as part of one our research degrees: MLitt , MPhil, or PhD.


MA in Interpreting Module

Semester 1 (September - December)
Compulsory Modules:

Interpreting II
Professional Seminar in Interpreting
Advanced English or Chinese/Japanese for Translators and Interpreters II
Translation Studies II
Options:

Translating II
Research Methods in T&I (required if doing Dissertation in summer)
Literary Translation or optional modules from other programmes
Semester 2 (January - June)
Compulsory Modules:

Interpreting II
Professional Seminar in Interpreting
Advanced English or Chinese/Japanese for Translators and Interpreters II
Options:

Translating II
Professional Issues in T&I (required if doing Project in summer)
or optional modules from other programmes.
Dissertation, or Translating/Interpreting Project

Note: All translating and interpreting modules cover both language directions, ie from English into Chinese/Japanese and from Chinese/Japanese into English.


MA in Translating Module

Semester 1 (September - December)
Compulsory Modules:

Translating II
Professional Seminar in Translation
Advanced English or Chinese/Japanese for Translators and Interpreters II
Translation Studies II
Options:

Interpreting II
Research Methods in T&I(required if doing Dissertation in summer)
Literary Translation or optional modules from other programmes.
Semester 2 (January - June)
Compulsory Modules:

Translating II
Professional Seminar in Translation
Advanced English or Chinese/Japanese for Translators and Interpreters II
Options:

Interpreting II
Professional Issues in T&I (required if doing Project in summer) or optional modules from other programmes.
Dissertation, or Translating/Interpreting Project

Note: All translating and interpreting modules cover both language directions, ie from English into Chinese/Japanese and from Chinese/Japanese into English.


MA in Translating and Interpreting Module

Semester 1 (September - December) MA Year
Compulsory Modules:

Translating II
Interpreting II
Professional Seminar in Translation or Interpreting
Advanced English or Chinese/Japanese for Translators and Interpreters II
Translation Studies II
Options:

Research Methods in T&I (required if doing Dissertation in summer)
Literary Translation or optional modules from other programmes.
Semester 2 (January - June)
Compulsory Modules:

Translating II
Interpreting II
Professional Seminar in Translation or Interpreting
Advanced English or Chinese/Japanese for Translators and Interpreters II
Options:

Professional Issues for Translators and Interpreters (required if doing Project in summer)
or optional modules from other programmes.
Dissertation, or Translating/Interpreting Project Note: All translating and interpreting modules cover both language directions, ie from English into Chinese/Japanese and from Chinese/Japanese into English.


MA in Translation Studies Module

Semester 1 (September - December) MA Year
Compulsory Modules:

Translating II
Advanced English or Chinese/Japanese for Translators and Interpreters II
Translation Studies II
Research Methods in T&I
Options:

Interpreting II
Literary Translation AND optional modules from other programmes.
Semester 2 (January - June)
Compulsory Modules:

Translating II
Advanced English or Chinese/Japanese for Translators and Interpreters II
Professional Issues for Translators and Interpreters
Options:

Interpreting II
optional modules from other programmes.
Dissertation, or Translating/Interpreting Project

Note: All translating and interpreting modules cover both language directions, ie from English into Chinese/Japanese and from Chinese/Japanese into English.


MA in Professional Translating for European Languages - University of Newcastle Upon Tyne

This exciting new course begins in September 2006. It will give you the training and know-how to become a professional translator

You will complete practical translation modules working between English on the one hand, and French, German or Spanish on the other (it is also possible to combine two of the latter languages). You will focus on translating into your mother tongue.
A range of translation studies modules (compulsory and optional) will give you in-depth insights into how translators translate between texts, people and cultures. This is crucial for understanding your work as a translation professional. Many Newcastle students find translation studies so interesting that they want to continue onto a research degree. This MA provides an ideal foundation for a 1-year MPhil or 3-year PhD course.
Other option modules will allow you to develop skills in liaison and consecutive interpreting, for example, or literary translation. And/or give you the know-how to set up and manage a small translation business.
Newcastle is a vibrant centre for translation training and research, with a truly international outlook. Since 1997 we have been running a successful suite of Diploma and MA degrees for Chinese and Japanese translating and interpreting. This combination of European and East Asian languages and students gives a global, cross-cultural vision of the translating profession that is one of our key strengths.

Course Structure
The course consists of compulsory modules, optional modules, and a summer Dissertation or Translation Project.

Compulsory modules
You will take these two 'core' modules:

Translation Practice and Principles
Professional Issues in Translating and Interpreting
Plus these four other compulsory modules:

Translation Workshop
Information Technology for Translators and Interpreters
Arts Research Methods
Research Methods in Translating and Interpreting
Optional modules
You will choose two or three of these (depending on credit value):

Liaison Interpreting
Consecutive Interpreting *
Literary Translation
Poetry and Translation *
Translation Studies 2
Enterprise and Entrepreneurship
Note:

The availability of modules marked * depends on student numbers.
You may also choose other optional modules available in the University if the Programme Director approves.
Dissertation or Translation Project
You will choose one of these:

a research Dissertation
a practical Translation Project


MA Translation Studies - University of Portsmouth

The MA Translation Studies is a balanced programme which addresses the situation of the translator as a multi-skilled individual. He or she not only has an excellent command of mother tongue and foreign language(s) and is prepared to be a thinking translator, but is technologically competent and aware of the world of the professional.

Course units include Translation Workshops (practical), Theory and Practice of Translation (the thinking part or one of them!), the Computer and the Translator (technology), Professional Aspects of Translation (professional)

Course Structure

Semester 1, Core units:
- Theory and Practice of Translation 1
- Specialised Translation Workshop 2

Semester 2:
- Theory and Practice of Translation 2
- Specialised Translation Workshop 2

Options:
- The Computer and the Translator
- Professional Aspects of Translation
- Subtitling
- Liaison Interpreting
- Cross Cultural Marketing Communication

Students are encouraged to develop specialisms through the Translation Project and the Dissertation, both of which have a practical focus.


MA/PgDip Arabic/English Translation Arabic/English Translation with Interpreting - University of Salford, Greater Manchester

Key Facts
Duration
MA: One year
PgDip: Nine months
Start month: September
Entry requirements
Applicants must be native speakers or have near-native competence in Arabic
Non-Arabic applicants should have an honours degree, or equivalent, in Arabic
Arab applicants should have a degree, or equivalent, in English
We welcome applications from students with alternative qualifications and/or significant relevant experience, subject to approval through a process of Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). For further details, contact: Hassane Lounis, T +44 (0)161 295 4460 h.lounis@salford.ac.uk
Early application is advised
Two references are required with the application

Mode of Attendance
Full-time
Key benefits
Longest-running programme of its kind in the UK
Interpreting option offered alongside translation
Specialised facilities in the School of Languages
Who is the programme for?
This programme is for students who want to become professional translators, freelance translators or interpreters or lecturers at university.
Programme content
This programme is designed to develop the skills in Arabic/English translation and interpreting needed in most international and regional organizations, government and non-government bodies, academic institutions and the media.
It integrates theoretical and practical training in various methods and techniques of translation and interpreting.
The translation studies element of the programme provides a vital foundation for the working translator and a good theoretical base for the dissertation.
Native speakers of the target language teach workshops. The interpreting module includes professional note-taking, for interpreting, and consecutive and simultaneous interpreting.
Students spend some hours each week studying English to improve writing skills and prepare for the MA dissertation. Students also take a module in Information Technology, which includes English and Arabic word-processing, editing and electronic mail.
Career progression
Many of our graduates take up academic posts teaching translation at university level, some continuing to PhD level. A number work in embassies and the British Council, others work in the private sector - for translation agencies and petroleum development companies, for example. This programme has a close association with the Centre for Language & Linguistics. Please visit www.esri.salford.ac.uk for details.


MA/PgDip Chinese/English/Chinese Translating with Interpreting - University of Salford, Greater Manchester

Key Facts
Duration
MA: 12 months full-time
PgDip: 9 months full-time
Please contact us on the details below for further information on part-time study
Start month: September
Entry requirements
A good, relevant honours degree or equivalent
Applicants must be native speakers of Chinese or English
Native speakers of Chinese must provide evidence of proficiency in English - IELTS 6.5 band score or a score of TOEFL at 575 or above (232 computer based) with a TWE of 4.0 or above are proof of this
We welcome applications from students with alternative qualifications and/or significant relevant experience, subject to approval through a process of Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). For further details, contact: Dr Ian Foster, School of Languages, T +44 (0)161 295 3720 or i.foster@salford.ac.uk

Mode of Attendance
Full-time / Part-time
Key benefits
IT training for terminology management and machine-assisted translation
State-of-the-art facilities for translators and interpreters
Opportunities for short professional placements during the programme
Who is the programme for?
This programme is for students planning careers
as translators or interpreters, or seeking to gain
high-level translating and interpreting skills.
Programme content
Core modules:
Lexicography and Terminology
IT for Translators
Academic English Writing (non-native speakers only)
Business Interpreting
Principles and Strategies of Translation
Translating from Chinese to English
Translating from English to Chinese
Plus one option from:
Extended Translation
Consecutive Interpreting
Translation Studies
A minor language, e.g. Japanese, French, German, Spanish or Italian.
Students also attend keynote lectures and seminars on specialised translation and business practice, held by invited professionals in the field. Topics and documents relate to fields covered in professional translation, such as economics, transport, telecommunications, medicine and international organizations. A series of research skills lectures, together with research seminars on Translation and Interpreting Studies, are organised for students taking the MA.
Assessment
Most of the modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and exams. Others are assessed by projects.
Career progression
Graduates can expect to pursue careers as translators, either freelance or in a translation department or company. Some may take up academic posts teaching translation at university level.


MA/PgDip Interpreting & Translating - University of Salford, Greater Manchester

Key FactsDurationMA: one year, full-time
PgDip: seven and a half months, full-time

Programme start date
September

Entry requirementsA good honours degree or equivalent
Applicants should be a native speaker (or equivalent standard) of English, French, German or Spanish and be able to demonstrate a high level of competency in their chosen foreign language
We welcome applications from students with alternative qualifications and/or significant relevant experience, subject to approval through a process of Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). For further details, contact:Dr Ian Foster, School of Languages, T +44 (0)161 295 3720 or i.foster@salford.ac.uk

Mode of Attendance
Full-time

Key benefits
Excellent reputation and links with professional organizations
Excellent graduate employment record
Opportunities for short work placements during the programme
Well-established links with the Directorate General Interpreting at the European Commission and involvement in their annual pedagogical assistance programme
Who is the programme for?
This programme is aimed at speakers of English and either French, German, or Spanish who want to become highly-trained translators, interpreters and linguists at international level.

Programme content
This programme provides high-level interpreting and translating skills for careers in international and regional organizations or in the freelance sector.
Students can study in the new state-of-the-art Language Resource Centre with staff who have both professional and research expertise.
Core modules:

Specialised Translation into and from English
Lexicography and Terminology
Principles and Strategies of Translation
Information Technology
Consecutive and simultaneous interpreting
The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and laboratory exercises. There is also the opportunity to participate in a series of mock conferences.
Keynote lectures and seminars on specialised translation and business practice, held by invited professionals in specialist fields also form part of the teaching format.
The School of Languages helps to organise training placements for its students in the UK or other EU countries in an interpreting environment.

Assessment
Assessment for the award of the PgDip is based
on a combination of coursework assignments and examinations.
Following successful completion of the taught modules, students following the MA path are required to complete the dissertation component of the programme, in English, during the summer.

Career progression
Graduates can expect to pursue careers as professional linguists, either as freelance translators and interpreters, or in a translation department or company. Some graduates have developed careers in publishing and as translation managers and terminologists.


MA/PgDip Translating - University of Salford, Greater Manchester

Faculty of Arts, Media & Social Sciences
School of Languages
Key FactsDurationMA: one year, full-time; two years, part-time

PgDip: seven and a half months, full-time; 15 months, part-time

Start month: September

Entry requirements

A good honours degree or equivalent
Applicants should also be native speakers (or equivalent standard) of English, French, German, Spanish, Italian or Greek, and be able to demonstrate a high level of competence in your chosen foreign language
We welcome applications from students with alternative qualifications and/or significant relevant experience, subject to approval through a process of Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). For further details, contact: Dr Ian Foster, School of Languages, T +44(0)161 295 3720 or i.foster@salford.ac.uk

Mode of Attendance
Full-time / Part-time

Key benefits
Excellent reputation and links with professional organizations
Excellent graduate employment record
Opportunities for short work placements during the programme
Who is the programme for?
This programme is aimed at speakers of English and either French, German, Greek, Italian or Spanish, and provides high-level translation skills required for careers in translation companies and departments in the UK, abroad, in international organizations or in the freelance sector.

Programme content
This programme is designed to meet the needs for highly trained translators in today's international marketplace.

Core modules:
Specialised Translation into and from English
Lexicography and Terminology
Principles and Strategies of Translation
Information Technology for Translators
Plus two options from:
Business Interpreting
Subsidiary ab initio language
Translation Studies
Translation from a Second Language into English
Students also attend keynote lectures and seminars on specialised translation and business practice, held by invited professionals.
The School helps to organise training placements in the UK or other EU countries in a translation environment.

Assessment
Assessment for the award of the PgDip is based
on a combination of coursework assignments and examination.
After successful completion of the taught programme, students proceed to the MA by preparing a dissertation, in English, during the summer.

Career progression
Our graduates have found employment in publishing and as translation managers and terminologists.


BA (Hons) Modern Languages and Translation and Interpreting Studies - University of Salford, Greater Manchester

Faculty of Arts, Media & Social Sciences
School of Languages
Key FactsDurationFour years full-time with a minimum two semesters residence abroad
Part-time students are advised to enquire regarding options.
Entry requirementsGCSE/ O level: English minimum grade C or equivalent
Advanced GCE level: 240-300 points. Normally three A2s or equivalent, with at least grade C in a language to be pursued post-GCE-A-level. A suitable combination of A2 and AS levels is also accepted
The General Studies paper is not regarded as an A level for this purpose, but results are noted
Successful applicants will have studied to A level or equivalent at least one of French, German, Italian or Spanish. Alternatively, the second language may be taken at beginners' level from French, German, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish
Students wishing to take English as a Foreign Language (EFL) must be non-native speakers. They should hold IELTS 6 or equivalent
Irish Leaving Certificate: BBBCC including a relevant language or, if beginning a language, with evidence of language learning ability
Scottish Highers: BBBBC including a relevant language or, if beginning a language, with evidence of language learning ability
IB: 28 points, including a relevant language
Applications are welcome from candidates with non-traditional or international qualifications, or with advanced language competence gained in ways other than through formal study. Such candidates may be required to demonstrate their ability, normally at interview

Mode of Attendance - Full-time

At a glance
4 good reasons to study Modern Languages and Translation and Interpreting Studies at Salford

School of Languages is regional winner of the Oriel National Languages for Export Award
Gain professional language skills
Learn a second language from beginners' level
Open access to the state-of-the-art Language Resource Centre
What's it about?
This programme aims to give you a high level of practical proficiency in two languages and to develop the relevant knowledge and skills to enable you to take up a career either in professional language use or in one of the many other fields that have traditionally opened up to our language graduates across the world. It will be especially attractive to the dedicated linguist looking for a combination of the academic and vocational, with an emphasis on employer-friendly transferable skills.

What will I learn?
You are likely to have studied to A level or equivalent at least one of French, German, Italian or Spanish. The second language may be taken at beginners' level or GCSE level from French, German, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish.

You progress from foundation modules in linguistics and the development of modern Europe to the study of theoretical principles central to translation and interpreting. Practical work starts with preparatory exercises such as text analysis, reformulation, summarising, note taking, followed by professionally orientated activities such as liaison and conference interpreting, glossary making and specialised translation.

How will I learn?
Language teaching takes the form of lectures, small-group seminars, laboratory practicals and oral tutorials, with some of this taking place in the Language Resource Centre.

How will I be assessed?
In the first year, language and translation and interpreting modules have written examinations, supplemented by continuous assessment throughout the year. In the second year continuous assessment takes over almost exclusively, whilst in the final year examinations are the most important assessment and are split into two periods. Additional assessment in the final year takes place through the dissertation.

Can I study overseas?
Over the years, Salford has developed a network of exchanges across Europe. Options are available for either studying at another institution abroad, working or a combination of the two options. As students on this programme are studying two languages, one semester is usually spent in each country.

Can I get work experience?
Whilst some students may wish to study abroad, others may wish to gain work experience. We offer a comprehensive network of paid industrial placements across Europe, with over 90% of our students in French and German, for example, on paid placements with major international companies. Whether you choose to take a study or work placement (or both) you can be reassured that you will be looked after by our experienced Residence Abroad Tutors, who monitor and visit students during their placements.

Where can I get a job?
In addition to the general opportunities afforded by graduates from languages degrees, this programme opens the way to postgraduate training and to specific careers as professional in-house or freelance translators and interpreters, lexicographers and terminologists.

Course codes - RRC2 French/German, RRC3 French/Italian, RRC4 French/Spanish, RR15 French/Portuguese, RRF3 German/Italian, RRL2 German/Spanish, RR25 German/Portuguese, RRH4 Italian/Spanish, RR45 Spanish/Portuguese, RR35 Italian/Portuguese, RQ19 French/EFL*, RQ29 German/EFL*, RQ39 Italian/EFL*, RQ49 Spanish/EFL*, RQ59 Portuguese/EFL*, * EFL = English as a Foreign Language


MA/PgDip Translating - University of Salford, Greater Manchester

Faculty of Arts, Media & Social Sciences
School of Languages
Key FactsDurationMA: one year, full-time; two years, part-time

PgDip: seven and a half months, full-time; 15 months, part-time

Start month: September

Entry requirements

A good honours degree or equivalent
Applicants should also be native speakers (or equivalent standard) of English, French, German, Spanish, Italian or Greek, and be able to demonstrate a high level of competence in your chosen foreign language
We welcome applications from students with alternative qualifications and/or significant relevant experience, subject to approval through a process of Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL). For further details, contact: Dr Ian Foster, School of Languages, T +44(0)161 295 3720 or i.foster@salford.ac.uk

Mode of Attendance - Full-time / Part-time

Key benefits
Excellent reputation and links with professional organizations
Excellent graduate employment record
Opportunities for short work placements during the programme
Who is the programme for?
This programme is aimed at speakers of English and either French, German, Greek, Italian or Spanish, and provides high-level translation skills required for careers in translation companies and departments in the UK, abroad, in international organizations or in the freelance sector.

Programme content
This programme is designed to meet the needs for highly trained translators in today's international marketplace.

Core modules:
Specialised Translation into and from English
Lexicography and Terminology
Principles and Strategies of Translation
Information Technology for Translators
Plus two options from:
Business Interpreting
Subsidiary ab initio language
Translation Studies
Translation from a Second Language into English
Students also attend keynote lectures and seminars on specialised translation and business practice, held by invited professionals.
The School helps to organise training placements in the UK or other EU countries in a translation environment.

Assessment
Assessment for the award of the PgDip is based
on a combination of coursework assignments and examination.
After successful completion of the taught programme, students proceed to the MA by preparing a dissertation, in English, during the summer.

Career progression
Our graduates have found employment in publishing and as translation managers and terminologists.


MA in Translation Studies - The University of Sheffield

Translation Studies is a discipline which has witnessed unparalleled growth in the last ten years.
One reason for this is that the world market in translation, which is already thought to be worth in excess of £10 billion a year, barely satisfies a fraction of the demand created by a global economy.

Businesses now operate in global markets, which means that international and governmental organizations require translation between more and more languages.
The computerised tools created to help meet these demands are becoming increasingly powerful and sophisticated. At the same time, the academic discipline of Translation Studies has blossomed, producing a wealth of new theoretical insights into the complexities of the translation process.

Translation Studies at Sheffield

The MA programme offered by the Modern Languages
Teaching Centre (MLTC) at Sheffield was launched in September 1996 and is designed to prepare students for the world of professional translation.

As a prospective MATS student you could come from one of many types of background including languages, law, literature, science and engineering. You also have a high level of competence in at least one foreign language. Translating is one obvious practical application of your language competence. Research shows that, as a language graduate in business, industry, or the professions, your translation skills will almost certainly be called upon in the course of your career.

Translating...
The MA in Translation Studies will add value to your credentials as a linguist, by confirming your ability to deal expertly and effectively with real-world language tasks.


MA in Screen Translation - University of Sheffield

The new MA in Screen Translation (MAST) is running from September 06. The MA aims to introduce students to the audiovisual medium of screen translation and it is designed to meet the huge increase in demand for screen translation in the media industry due to the acceleration of technological progress. This can be seen for example in the development of products like the DVD, which has a format with the capacity to hold up to eight dubbed versions and thirty two subtitled versions of a film.

The MAST programme will include modules on:

• The Theory and Practise of Subtitling and Dubbing
• Translation, Transposition and Adaptation in European and World Cinema
• Screen Translation of Literary Classics
• Approaches to Screen translation in Cartoons and Films for Children

Films from countries and continents including France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, China, Japan, Korea, Africa, India, North and South America will be studied.

As it combines the underlying theoretical issues involved in screen translation with the practical aspects of the screen translation process, the programme is of interest to all graduate linguists who intend to pursue a career in the developing field of the screen translation industry or related areas.

The programme is designed for students wanting to specialise in screen translation and also for practising translators interested in acquiring fresh skills. The programme will cater for a wide range of students who wish to acquire a critical understanding of contemporary issues in translation alongside the practical skills required in today’s fast evolving screen translation industry.

The MA in Screen Translation enjoys strong support from the Sheffield Showroom Cinema.


MA in Translation - University of Surrey, Guildford

The Centre for Translation Studies (CTS) within the Department of Culture, Media and Communication has an excellent reputation for training translators.

Our MA programme is specially designed to equip language graduates with the comprehensive range of practical and theoretical skills they will need to work as professional translators. This highly regarded programme has been an established route to a choice of exciting national and international job opportunities since 1985.

Further information about this programme can be obtained from the address below.

Department of Culture, Media and Communication
University of Surrey
Guildford
GU2 7XH
UK

What the programme offers

The one-year MA programme offers translation training between English and the following languages (subject to demand): Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish

Like all programmes at the University of Surrey, the MA in Translation is designed for practical application in the real world. Under the direction of Dr Margaret Rogers (Director of CTS) and Dr Jeremy Munday (Deputy Director of CTS), and taught by staff including professional translators, it is structured to provide students with both the advanced translation skills and broad theoretical understanding they will need to cope with professional life.

Translation and more

Translation is the core of the programme and about 60% of your time as an MA student will be spent translating a wide range of specialist texts under the guidance of professional translators. In addition, you will have:

subject background lectures relevant to applied translation
an introduction to the concepts of terminology and translation theory
the opportunity to undertake an extended translation and commentary
the chance to meet a range of professionals who will give seminars on the practical aspects of their working lives.

How is the programme structured

The taught programme of around 16 hours a week consists of applied translation classes and supporting lectures. In addition, weekly translation assignments in each of the translation subjects will be set. On completion of the nine-month taught programme, students can receive a Diploma in Translation. Those who successfully carry out a further three-month period of dissertation research will be awarded the MA in Translation.

What you will achieve

The combination of specialist teaching and independent study allows MA/Diploma students to develop a range of language, theory and study skills. When you have completed the programme, you will:

have competence in the practice of translation
have appropriate understanding of relevant specialist areas
be familiar with theories of translation
have practical skills in terminology studies and related areas of professional practice
have completed a sustained piece of work as independent study.

Who can apply
We welcome applications from those with a language degree or appropriate professional experience and linguistic proficiency.

Entry requirements

UK applicants - a good first degree in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swedish or Turkish.
Overseas applicants - either a good undergraduate degree in English or an equivalent qualification plus a high level of proficiency in English.

If you do not have formal proficiency and qualifications, we will consider you for entry if you can produce documented evidence of linguistic ability or relevant working experience. You may be asked to attend an interview and/or take a translation or other test to confirm that you have skills at the necessary level.


MA in Audiovisual Translation - University of Surrey, Guildford

Audiovisual Translation is an exciting new field in Translation Studies for which there is a growing professional demand. The PG Diploma/MA programme aims to provide a broad introduction to the subject ranging from dubbing and voice-over to surtitling and subtitling, while offering a practical focus on professionally-oriented training in interlingual subtitling, with other audiovisual options, including audiodescription.

To find out more

Further information about this programme can be obtained from the address below.

Department of Culture, Media and Communication
University of Surrey
Guildford
GU2 7XH
UK

What the programme offers

The one-year MA programme comprises the following principal components:

Linguistic Principles
Audiovisual Translation and Translation Issues
Hands-on Project with Commentary
Interlingual subititling (languages currently on offer, subject to demand: Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish, all paired with English)

Options are normally available in Monolingual Subtitling for the deaf and hard of hearing, and in Audiodescription for the blind and partially sighted. Students may also add to their language portfolio through intensive study of a new language for translation purposes, or extend their specialist translation expertise.

How is the programme structured

The taught programme comprises a combination of core modules, subtitling practice and a range of options. Students will follow a hands-on module in interlingual subtitling according to language choice in the autumn and the spring. There are also available options in specialist translation and ab initio languages for translation purposes. Work on the dissertation begins towards the end of the spring semester and is normally completed over the summer vacation.


Why choose this programme

Learning from professionals and academics in a supportive environment, you will be entering one of the few programmes which is dedicated to Audiovisual Translation, preparing you for the professional market as well as research. Subtittling and audiodescription are taught by professionals who are active in the market.

Entry requirements

Entry is open to applicants with a good first degree in English or equivalent with Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish as mother tongue or those with equivalent linguistic competence. Native speakers of those languages without a first degree in English should normally have at least 6.5 IELTS (writing 6.5).


MA in Monolingual Subtitling and Audiodescription - University of Surrey, Guildford

The context for this exciting programme is socially-inclusive modern world in which accessibility to different audiovisual media for the deaf and hard of hearing as well as for the blind and partially sighted is receiving increased attention. The programme aims to provide a thorough training for graduates wishing to work in Monolingual subtitling of TV programmes and films, and in Audiodescription including for live theatre productions.

For more information on Monolingual Subtitling and Audiodescription
visit the and the

Further information about this programme can be obtained from the address below.

Department of Culture, Media and Communication
University of Surrey
Guildford
GU2 7XH
UK

The one-year MA programme comprises the following principal components:

Linguistic Principles
Audiovisual Translation and Translation Issues
Hands-on Project with Commentary
Monolingual Subtitling
Audiodescription

Options are available in Creative Writing, Translation of Children's Literature and Translation of Drama. Students may also learn a completely new language from scratch through intensive study.

How is the programme structured

The taught programme comprises a combination of core modules, subtitling and Audiodescription practice, as well as a range of options. Students will follow hands-on modules in monolingual subtitling and in audiodescription throughout the autumn and the spring. Options in Creative Writing, Translation of Children's Literature and Translation of Drama will each be available for one semester. A further option in ab initio languages for translation purposes will run throughout the two semesters. Work on the dissertation begins towards the end of the spring semester and in normally completed over the summer vacation.

Why choose this programme

Learning from professionals and academics in a supportive environment, you will be joining a unique programme, preparing you for the professional market as well as research.

Entry requirements

Entry is open to applicants with with excellent linguistic skills in English and a good first degree (second class honours or equivalent) in English, Modern Languages, Journalism, Applied Linguistics or similar subject.


Distance Learning MA/Diploma In Translation - University of West of England, Bristol

This vocationally orientated course will enable you to develop your translation skills, both from and into English, to a professional level. You will tackle a wide variety of general translation passages and will have the opportunity to develop new translation skills in the areas of business and ICT. Modules in Theories of Translation, Critique of Translation, Humour and its Translation and Text Linguistics provide you with the theoretical underpinning to enable you to write the Masters dissertation.

The distance course, which is conducted entirely on-line, allows you to decide how many, or how few, modules you want to take per year. This gives you the flexibility to vary your commitment according to other calls on your time. Course fees are paid on a 'per module' basis, so the cost of the course can easily be spread to make it more manageable. The Postgraduate Diploma is made up of 120 credits. If you want to proceed to the MA, you will complete a 60-credit dissertation module as well. MA Translation with Language Technology - University of Wales, Swansea

As part of its flourishing specialization in translation, the University of Wales Swansea offers an MA in Translation with Language Technology. Research in computing and translation has resulted in a variety of powerful computer tools supporting the translator. Modern professional translators cannot afford to ignore them. The MA in Translation with Language Technology (MATLT) teaches how to do translation to professional standards with optimal use of computational support tools.

Highlights of the programme
What do I learn in the MA Translation with Language Technology?

Advanced practical work with translation of journalistic, administrative, and technical texts
Intensive hands-on training with state-of-the-art Computer-Assisted-Translation tools
Thorough grounding in the linguistic and cultural principles of translation theory
Wide choice of languages, some of which can also be studied at beginner’s or intermediate level
A variety of options, including (for some languages) interpreting
When and how do I study in the MA TLT?

The programme starts in September and can be completed in one calender year by full time students.
It is also available as a two-year part-time programme.
Part 1 is taught from September till May.
Part 2 consists of two extended translations (simulated professional projects) or an academic dissertation, depending on the student’s choice.
What is the environment and support offered by the university?

Dedicated and competent members of staff for each language
Outstanding computing facilities, including two labs (40 and 24 positions) with dedicated support staff
Pre-sessional English courses for non-native speakers of English
Optional half-day pre-sessional Computational Skills introduction
Excellent library facilities with an up-to-date selection of manuals, dictionaries, and academic publications on all aspects of translation
Well-equipped campus with a superb seaside location

Language pairs
German - English, French - English, Italian - English, Spanish - English, Portuguese - English, Welsh - English, Russian - English, Polish - English, Greek - English, Chinese - English


MA/Diploma in Translation Studies - University of Warwick

Description
This is a twelve-month full-time (24 months part-time) programme of study leading to an MA in Translation Studies. Its aim is to examine translation in context and to look at ways in which texts are manipulated in the process of transfer across languages and cultures. Students are encouraged to develop their interest in intercultural communication and combine the study of theoretical models with active translation work.

All students will follow a core course and an option in Terms 1 and 2. You can find out more about the available courses below.

Core Course (Term 1): Introduction to Translation Studies
This course examines the main theoretical concepts currently discussed in translation studies, and demonstrates how they influence translation practice. By taking a cultural studies approach, rather than a purely linguistic approach, the course seeks to explore the impact of translation as a force for change and to trace the ways in which texts are received by readers in different cultural contexts. more ...

Core Course (Term 2): Problems of Cultural Transfer
The aim of this course is to introduce the notion of a cultural transfer in relation to literary and cultural texts. Particular attention will be paid to the notions of influence, translation, reception and power relations. Each session contains a theoretical part and a case study. more ...

Approved Options
Students may choose any two of a wide range of approved options taught at the Centre. The list of options will vary according to staff availability. The options offered in recent years included:

History of Translation
Word to Image Translation
Literary Translation and Creative (Re)Writing in a Global Context
Translation and Mass Media Communication
Children's Literature in Translation
Teaching members of staff are all practising translators, working across a wide range of languages.

Assessment
MA: A 5,000 word essay for each of the two option modules (30 CATS each) and a 20,000-25,000 word dissertation for the core modules (60 CATS each core).
Diploma: A 5,000 word essay for each of the two option modules (30 CATS each) and a 10,000 word essay for the core modules (30 CATS each core).

Media Pathway
Students will be able to follow a media pathway through the MA in Translation Studies. Students interested in following this path will take the two core courses for the MA in Translation Studies and the options Word to Image and Translation and Mass Media Communication.

Assessment will be based on a 5,000 word essay on each of the optional courses and a dissertation dealing with a topic in translation and media.

Entry Requirements
A good Honours degree in humanities or related area, and a knowledge of another foreign language.

Candidates from overseas will normally be expected to have an English language test result (IELTS 7 or equivalent).


MA/Diploma in Translation, Media and Cultural Transfer - University of Warwick

Description
This is a twelve-month full-time (24 months part-time) programme of study leading to an MA in Translation, Media and Cultural Transfer. Its aim is to teach how to identify, analyse and criticise significant linguistic, semiotic and discursive features of the various types of translation that take place within different media. Current debates in media and translation studies will also be examined, with particular emphasis on the use of intercultural translation in the global media. Students are encouraged to develop their interest in intercultural communication through the study of theoretical models and practical case studies.

All students will follow a core course and an option in Terms 1 and 2. You can find out more about the available courses below.

Core Course (Term 1): Introduction to Translation Studies
This course examines the main theoretical concepts currently discussed in translation studies, and demonstrates how they influence translation practice. By taking a cultural studies approach, rather than a purely linguistic approach, the course seeks to explore the impact of translation as a force for change and to trace the ways in which texts are received by readers in different cultural contexts. more....

Core Course (Term 2): Translation and Mass Media Communication
This module critically examines the role of translation in mass media communication. It offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the investigation of cross-cultural communication and power in global news, advertising, and documentary television. more....

Approved Options
Students may choose any two of a wide range of approved options taught at the Centre. The list of options will vary according to staff availability. The options offered in recent years included:

Word to Image Translation
Issues of Representation
From Text to Screen: Visualisation of Black and Asian Literature
Problems of Cultural Transfer
Comparative Literary and Cultural Theory
Introduction to British Cultural Studies
Teaching members of staff are all practising translators, working across a wide range of languages.

Assessment
MA: A 5,000 word essay for each of the two option modules (30 CATS each) and a 20,000-25,000 word dissertation for the core modules (60 CATS each core).
Diploma: A 5,000 word essay for each of the two option modules (30 CATS each) and a 10,000 word essay for the core modules (30 CATS each core).

MA/Diploma in Translation, Writing and Cultural Difference - University of Warwick

This is an innovative and interdisciplinary twelve-month full-time (24 months part-time) programme of study leading to an MA. Its aim is to examine translation between English and either German, French or Italian in a cultural context, and develop communicative, imaginative and critical abilities related to literary writing. Students are encouraged to develop their interest in intercultural communication and combine the study of theoretical models with active translation work and creative writing.

All students will take the following modules.

Core Module (Term 1):
Introduction to Translation Studies (Centre for Translation and Comparative Cultural Studies)
Language specific Core Module (Term 1):
Intercultural Transactions in French from the Middle Ages to the Present Day (Department of French Studies)
Translation and Cultural Difference between German and English (Department of German Studies)
Translation and Communication Skills (Department of Italian)
One of the Writing Core Modules (Term 2):
Crossing Borders: Writing, Language, Cultural Transfer (Department of English)
Writing Poetry (Department of English)
Creative Writing (Department of English)
One Option Module (Term 2) selected from the list of postgraduate modules offered by all the participating departments.
Option modules change annually, and an updated list is available at the beginning of the Autumn term. Modules typically available include:
Problems of Cultural Transfer
Literary Translation and Creative (Re)Writing in a Global Context
Books, Subversion and the Republic of Letters
Translation and Mass Media Communication
Cinema and the Representation of Interiority

Emigrants, Migrants, Immigrants
France and its Others
Understanding German Unification
Fictions and History
Problems and Modes in Postcolonial Literature

Assessment
Modules are assessed by a 5000-7000-word essay, or a translation with a commentary, or a commentary on the publication history/reception of a translated text. Writing Core Modules taught in Term 2 are assessed by a 7000-word essay or a writing portfolio. In the summer term students will work on a 15,000-word dissertation. This may be a translation with a commentary, a comparative commentary on existing translations, or a dissertation on a topic related to translation studies or intercultural difference.

Entry requirements
1. Good degree in English, French, German, Italian (2.1 equivalent), or an equally good degree in another humanities subject with proof of a high level of competence both in written English and at least one of the three languages, French, German, Italian.
2. Applicants will be asked to submit a portfolio consisting of the following components:
(i) 5000 words consisting of creative writing (fiction, travel writing etc but not academic writing) where a minimum of 1000 words must be in English (translation into English and/or into one of the languages included in the MA; accompanied by originals).
(ii) Academic writing sample of between 2000 and 5000 words in English.
3. English language proficiency test result for students whose mother tongue is not English (IELTS 7 or equivalent)

 

The list of translation courses shown above is not all inclusive and the translation courses shown will be subject to change, addition and removal.

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