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Translation Courses - London

To become an Axis Translations approved translator you must be a qualified translator, together with relevant translation experience. There is much more to being a translator (as you will discover) then simply speaking a second language.

On this basis, please find the following list of translation courses:

Translation Studies MA - Birbeck University of London

Aims
This programme is aimed primarily at practising translators, interpreters or teachers who wish to broaden their knowledge of the specifically theoretical underpinnings of translating/interpreting and carry out research into linguistic, sociolinguistic or psychological aspects of translating/interpreting. However, if you are not a professional translator but would like to deepen your knowledge of the field, you will also find this degree of interest.

Content
As a student you will follow three core courses, including Issues in Translation, plus a seminar-based research course. In addition, you may choose four further study units from a range of topics, including language-specific options.

Core courses
Research Methods
Issues in Translation
Linguistic Analysis
Research seminar in a subdomain of applied linguistics that is the topic of your research for your dissertation.

Options
Four options from a list including:

Sociolinguistics
Social Psychology of Language
Psycholinguistics
Phonetics and Phonology
Second Language Acquisition
Statistics
Further language-specific options are offered by the departments of French, German and Spanish.

Dissertation.
Teaching
Lectures, seminars and group work.

Assessment
Coursework – continuous assessment; research dissertation of 12,000–15,000 words.

Special features
Focuses on the study of translation as process.
Multidisciplinary approach.
Opportunities to conduct theoretical or language-specific research.


Diploma in Translation - City University, London

The Institute of Linguists ' Diploma in Translation is a professional qualification intended for those who, having reached a level of linguistic competence at least equivalent to a good Honours degree, wish to embark on a career in professional translation.

Successful candidates are entitled to use the designation 'Dip Trans'. On provision of evidence of oral competence they are also eligible to apply for full membership of the Institute.

The Diploma tests the ability of candidates to translate to a professional standard, together with their awareness of the professional task of the translator. The passages set for translation will be of the standard of difficulty that translators would expect to meet in their daily work. They will not however be of an over-technical or specialised nature.


Postgraduate Certificate in Translation Skills - City University, London

City University offers a Distance-Learning Course leading to the Postgraduate Certificate in Translation Skills, for graduate translators with work experience wishing to obtain an internationally recognised professional qualification.

The course lasts 2 years and consists of 6 modules, with examinations at the end of the 3rd and 6th modules. Teaching is by highly experienced and qualified tutors, with continuous assessment and comment via e-mail with the individual students. Normally students also attend one local workshop per module, given by a suitably qualified and experienced academic.

The PGCTS is currently offered in translation from Spanish to English, principally in conjunction with partner institutions in South America, though other students who wish to offer this language combination may register directly with City University through the Course Coordinator (see below). Since 1998, this course has been successfully operating in conjunction with the Colegio de Traductores Públicos de Buenos Aires in Argentina, and City University has recently extended coverage to include Chile. We hope to expand to include Portuguese and other languages in the near future, and any enquiries in this respect should also be directed to the Course Coordinator.


Intensive Courses in Translation for Media - City University, London

English into Italian

Stage I: 03 - 28 July 2006
Stage II: 10 - 21 July 2006
Stage III: 24 July - 4 August 2006

English into Spanish

Stage I: 03 - 28 July 2006

The TV and cinema subtitling and dubbing industry in Italy and Spain is a well-established market requiring professional translators with specific skills. Texts to be translated and adapted can be of many different kinds: scientific and technical documentaries, interviews, news reports, cartoons, soap operas and movies. All of this is presented to the translator as audio-visual material with or without the support of a written script. This course programme will equip the translator with the necessary skills to work in the fields of film and video, television and multimedia. The course content in each language option will vary slightly as it is tailored to the needs of the local market.

Stage I provides an introduction to translation for voice-over in documentaries and interviews, dialogue in cartoons and films, and subtitling of all of those.

Stage II builds on Stage I to develop adaptation techniques for voice-over.

Stage III builds on Stage II to develop adaptation techniques for dialogue.

Entry requirements
All courses are targeted at Italian and Spanish mother-tongue translators. Applicants for Stage I must either be professional translators or have already received some training in translation. In addition, applicants for Stages II and III must have successfully completed the preceding stages or demonstrate equivalent experience. All applicants for Stage I will be sent a short test to complete and submit with their application.

Coursework
All three stages will be based on practice and feedback and participants will learn how to recognise and handle all the specific requirements of texts taken from real work situations. The tutors are established professionals within the industry as well as experienced trainers.

Stage I: Tuition takes place on three afternoons per week (total 36 hours). In addition participants will be required to work intensively on translation projects. The Italian course will cover translation for voice-over dubbing and subtitling of documentaries and interviews - both with and without a written script in the first three weeks - while the fourth week will tackle the translation of dialogue for dubbing and subtitling. Furthermore, there will be a seminar introducing students to the technical side of subtitling. The Spanish course will concentrate slightly more on subtitling in order to cater for the specific needs of the local market.

Stage II: Tuition takes place on three afternoons each week (total 18 hours). In addition, participants will be required to work intensively on translation projects for which they will receive 3 one-to-one tutorials. The course topics will cover translation, time coding, time synchronisation and editing of a range of texts for voice-over dubbing. The differences between adaptation techniques for voice-over and subtitling will also be highlighted during the course.

Stage III: Tuition takes place on three afternoons each week (total 18 hours). In addition, participants will be required to work intensively on translation projects, for which they will receive 3 one-to-one tutorials. The course topics will cover translation of dialogue, time coding, adaptation and lip synchronisation.

For all courses, audio-visual material, video machines and computers will be available at the University to allow the participants to work autonomously on their projects.

Certificate of completion
At the end of the course, all participants will receive a Certificate of Completion, provided that attendance has been regular and course projects completed. Course participants of Level I who wish to obtain a graded Certificate of Achievement may opt to complete an additional assignment for assessment. Participants of Level II and III may obtain a graded Certificate of Achievement if their final project meets the required standard.

Legal Terminology for Translators - City University, London


Legal Terminology for Translators: The Law of Property - City University, London

For translators interested in the Law of Property

Dates for the next course to be confimed.

A course for practising Spanish translators interested in property law.

Lecturer: Susana de las Cuevas qualified English Solicitor and Spanish Lawyer with Fernando Scornik Gerstein

Day 1: Conveyancing
Introduction - Rights in Rem - Constitution - Acquisition - Extinction - Publicity of Rights in Rem - Possession and Ownership - Classification of Rights in Rem - Rights of Enjoyment - Rights of Guarantee - Pre-emption Rights - The Land Registry

Day 2: Trust and Probate
Testamentary Probates - The Estate - The Will -Types of Will - Contents of a Will - Beneficiaries - Substitution Beneficiaries - Legacies - Executors - Trusts - Statutory Beneficiaries and their Share in the Estate - Intestate Probates - Q & A

This course is aimed at English-Spanish and Spanish-English translators. The morning and early afternoon sessions (10.00 - 1.00pm and 2.00 - 3.30pm) will consist of lectures on the law, while the afternoon workshops (4.00 - 6.00pm) focus on the terminology used in specific contexts, using source texts in Spanish. The workshops will be run by Nicolas Chadwick, an experienced legal translator.

The Law of Contract
For translators interested in the Law of Contract


Legal Terminology for Translators: The Law of Contract - City University, London

A course for practising translators interested in commercial law

Lecturer: Clare Canton LL.M (Cantab) MA (London)

Law of Contract I - Friday 31 March 2006
Introduction - formation of a contract - contents of a contract - terms and representations - exclusion clauses - examination of specific clauses in a contract for the sale of goods

Law of Contract II - Saturday 01 April 2006
Discharge of the contract and its consequences - remedies and damages - action for price - injunctions - specific performance - consideration of various forms of agreement, letters and assignments

The morning and early afternoon sessions (10.00 - 1.00pm and 2.00 - 3.30pm) will consist of lectures on the law, while the legal translation workshops in the afternoon (4.00 - 6.00pm) will focus on the language used in specific contexts. Workshops will be held in French, German, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese.*

Commercial and Corporate Law
For translators interested in Commercial and Coporate Law


Legal Terminology for Translators: Commercial & Corporate Law - City University, London

A course for practising translators interested in commercial and corporate law

Lecturer: Clare Canton LL.M (Cantab) MA (London)

Friday 23 June 2006 Commercial Law
Introduction - contracts for the sale of goods - the Sale of Goods Act 1979, as amended by the Sale and Supply of Goods Act 1994 - definitions - the passing of property and risk - transfer of title by a non-owner - performance - implied terms - exclusion of a seller's liability - remedies of the buyer and seller - hire purchase agreements

Saturday 24 June 2006 Corporate Law
Different methods of trading - public and private limited companies - memorandum and articles of association - application for shares - borrowing, debentures and charges - meetings and resolutions - sale of a company

The morning and early afternoon sessions (10.00-1.00pm and 2.00-3.30pm) will consist of lectures on the law, while the afternoon workshops (4.00-6.00pm) will focus on the language used in specific contexts. Workshops will be held in French, German, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese


MSc in Scientific, Technical and Medical Translation with Translation Technology - Imperial College, London

These days translation professionals need to be technically well-informed and linguistically talented people who not only possess a clear understanding of the issues involved in dragging a text across boundaries of language and culture, but are also able to utilise the latest computer-based translation technology in order to get the job done. The MSc in Scientific, Technical and Medical Translation with Translation Technology (MScTrans) draws upon a very wide range of tutors with extensive specialised linguistic and translation expertise to provide training in translation within a large number of language pairs. MScTrans will make participants familiar with a variety of "translation technologies", including machine translation, translation memory, terminology management, and software and WWW localisation. Students on the programme will become experienced in translating a variety of technical and specialised text-types - currently technical, scientific, medical, software and WWW. In each instance the practical translation work will be clearly linked to the use of the most up-to-date computer-based translation tools. In addition, further compulsory and optional modules in linguistics, translation theory, the history of translation, and editing and WWW publishing skills will help to ensure that participants are provided with a fully-rounded programme of study. The programme is taught via lectures, seminars, practical translation classes and hands-on sessions in a computer cluster. There is also a dissertation and two extended translation projects to complete.

It is our hope that graduates from the new course will be fully equipped to meet the challenges of the new working methodologies which the course focuses on, whether they end up working in an international institution (such as the EU or the UN), in a commercial translation company, or as specialised freelancers.

The entry requirements are a IIi degree or equivalent, and we have found that the programme has been of interest to both scientists and people with a language background.

Further details can be obtained from:

MSc in Scientific, Technical and Medical Translation with Translation Technology Humanities Programme
Imperial College London
South Kensington Campus
London SW7 2AZ
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0)20 7594 8833, Fax: +44 (0)20 7594 8759

The Course

Translators work on the widest possible variety of material, ranging from medical reports and research papers, through parliamentary proceedings, patents and product documentation, to publicity material, web pages and software.

Many major translation projects are undertaken as a team effort, with a single set of documents often being translated simultaneously into several languages with the aid of shared electronic resources and translation tools.

At Imperial College we prepare participants for this professional reality.

Through a combination of theoretical, language-specific and optional modules, we introduce participants to the wide range of knowledges, skills and methodologies necessary for researching and producing high-quality translations of a technical, specialist nature.

We work closely with the specialist software providers and other industry partners to ensure that the course possesses the maximum of professional relevance.

The MSc's curriculum conforms very closely to the recent recommendations published by the European Commission-funded LETRAC project (Language Engineering for Translators Curricula). We are also corporate members of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting and have a good working relationship with this professional body's London Regional Group, from whose ranks a number of our tutors are drawn.

The course focuses on written translation and the texts we use for translation practice will relate to various
technical areas to develop your translation skills in a range of subjects besides your own particular specialism.

During the course you will become conversant with the computer-based translation technology which has been
transforming the way in which professional translators work.

You will gain extensive hands-on experience with machine translation, translation memory, software localization
and terminology management systems.

Regular team-based projects will simulate the manner in which large-scale translation jobs are carried through.
These are specifically designed not only to give you a chance to use the software "for real", but also to enable
you to experience a number of translation-related roles, such as those of terminologist, proof-reader,
desk-top publishing specialist and even project manager .

Most modules are assessed through a combination of essays or other coursework, and formal examinations.

The programme lasts an entire calendar year (or two for part-time study), and ends with the submission of a
dissertation at the end of August.


MA Applied Translation Studies - London Metropolitan University

This course specialises in non-literary translation, focusing on areas as diverse as law, politics, science, technology, medicine, media (subtitling), business and tourism.

At present Language combinations from and into English are: Arabic, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Russian and Spanish. Chinese (Mandarin) will be available from September 2004.

Aims of the course
This is an international course run jointly by London Metropolitan University and the Institut Libre Marie Haps in Brussels (Belgium). It is a one-year full-time or two-year part-time postgraduate academic training in translation, developed to meet the increasingly complex needs of technical and scientific industries. It has a strong vocational emphasis on specialist, non-literary translation, focusing on areas as diverse as law, politics, science, technology, medicine, business, tourism, media and the arts, underpinned by a work placement. Part of the course may be taken in distance-learning mode.

The following languages are included, to and from English:

Arabic
Italian
Chinese (Mandarin)
Japanese
Dutch
Polish
French
Portuguese
German
Russian
Greek
Spanish
Entry requirements
Candidates should normally have:

A 2.1 first degree (or a 2.2 with professional experience in translation). Candidates with substantial experience as a professional translator but no degree will be considered
A good command of their second foreign language (see list above);
A very good command of English. One of the following qualifications is required:
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade A
- IELTS 6.5 minimum with a minimum score in all component parts of 6
- TOEFL (old exam) 630 minimum
- TOEFL (new exam) 267 minimum
Students may be required to take an entrance aptitude test.

Course structure
You will take a total of eight modules — three core, two specialist, one project, one research paper and one placement.

Core modules:
Characteristics of Non-literary Translation
Theoretical Issues in Translation
Translation Tools and the Translator
Specialist modules:
Specialist modules involve the translation of specialist texts from one or two of the following areas:

Business/Economics
Law/Politics
Media and The Arts
Medicine/Biology
Science/Technology/IT
Tourism
Projects
Two project modules are taken: an annotated translation and commentary (double module), and a research paper on translation.

Placement
There is a compulsory professional placement, in the UK or abroad, with a final report on work undertaken. If you are already employed as a translator you can use your job as your placement.

Assessment
A variety of methods, including coursework and a placement.

Career opportunities
Students gain enhanced opportunities as a professional translator in the specialist fields in which they choose to focus upon in the course. Accreditation of the double-module project may exempt students from Papers Two and Three of the Institute of Linguists' Postgraduate Diploma in Translation.


MA The Theory and Practice of Translation - Middlesex University, London

Our students develop as highly skilled, practically and theoretically informed writers, editors and critics of translations. They have a good understanding of literary, linguistic and cultural theory and are ready to enter professions, including the translation profession, that require advanced textual, linguistic and intercultural skills.

Our students come from all over the world. They are enthusiastic, inquisitive and supportive of one another's work.

Programme content
The programme is organised in a series of modules taught over two semesters and the summer (for full time students) or four semesters and the summer (for part time students)
Literature and its Translation enhances students’ understanding of the theoretical notions and descriptive vocabulary relevant to literary studies, literary theory and the identification of literary genres. It enables students to apply this understanding when translating and editing translations of literary texts.
Translational Stylistics enhances students’ understanding of the theoretical notions and descriptive vocabulary relevant to stylistic study and to the creation of literary texts and literary translations. It enables students to apply this understanding when translating and editing translations of literary texts.
Research in Translation Studies serves a dual purpose: it trains students in research skills necessary for the MA dissertation and for progression to the PhD; and it enables students to evaluate claims made in the literature. The first semester module introduces basic research skills (for example, bibliographical searches, the use of dictionaries and databases, preparing a research proposal), while the second semester module focuses on more advanced research methodologies (for example, investigating the processes involved in translation, investigating the translation product, investigating the reception of translations, investigating the editing of translations).
The History and Theory of Translation informs students about the development of their field of study. It is complemented by the module Approaches to Translation which provides an insight into specific contemporary 'schools' within translation studies, together with introductions to aspects of literary, linguistic and cultural theory which are particularly pertinent to the translation of humanities texts.
The Dissertation enables students to produce an extended research project or annotated translation of their own.

Programme outline
Full time students
Semester One
Literature and its Translation (TRA4013)
The History and Theory of Translation (TRA4054)
Research in Translation Studies 1 (TRA4041)
Semester Two
Translational Stylistics (TRA4014)
Approaches to Translation (TRA4050)
Research in Translation Studies 2 (TRA4042)
Summer
Dissertation (TRA4060)
See module descriptions

Part time students
Year One
Semester One
Literature and its Translation (TRA4013)
Research in Translation Studies 1 (TRA4041)
Semester Two
Translational Stylistics (TRA4014)
Research in Translation Studies 2 (TRA4042)
Summer
Long Essay/Research Project for TRA4042
See module descriptions

Year Two
Semester One
The History and Theory of Translation (TRA4054)
Semester Two
Approaches to Translation (TRA4050)
Summer
Dissertation (TRA4060)
See module descriptions

Teaching and Learning
Classes for the MA are mainly lectures and seminars. We also provide essay clinics and language-specific tutorials. Classes include discussions and student presentations of work.
Since this is a postgraduate programme, we place considerable emphasis on developing student autonomy, and we expect students to read widely and with some independence, beyond the set reading.
In 2004/2005 all classes are held on Tuesdays and we expect this to be the same for 2005/2006.
Entry requirements
Applicants should normally hold a good first degree in a relevant subject. They must have near-native or native command of English and at least one other language.
Overseas candidates must have an IELTS score of 6.5 or above or a TOEFL score of 575 (paper based) or 237 (computer based) or above, or the Cambridge Proficiency Certificate at grade C or above, or a GCSE in English language at grade C or above.


BA Honours Translation - Middlesex University, London

Single honours degree
Four years full-time, including work placement year or year abroad
Part-time study available
This is the single honours degree in Translation currently available with English in five language strands: Chinese, French, German, Italian and Spanish. We are also planning to offer strands in Greek and Turkish.

We also offer a strand for bilingual students where you can take two languages alongside English. We also offer a major or minor in Translation.

Programme structure
There are three main strands in the BA Honours Translation. In the third year (semesters five and six) you will take either a period of study abroad or a work placement, or a combination.

Teaching is through a mixture of lectures and seminar work, with tutorials when appropriate. Students often do projects, either on their own or with fellow students.

The Translation Studies Strand
Modules in this strand are taken by everyone seeking to specialise in translation - they are not language specific. You will be taught with students from all language versions for this strand of the programme of study.

The main purpose of the modules in this strand is to inform you about the discipline's historical, cultural, conceptual and theoretical foundations, about debates within it and about research methods appropriate to it. Nevertheless, there will be a strong emphasis on translation practice, so that you can put the theoretical input to the test.

You will translate texts mostly from English into your other language, discuss with your colleagues the problems you have encountered and advise one another on potential ways of solving them. When we assess coursework of this nature, we attach great importance to your comments on the translations, though the work will normally be graded by at least one speaker of the language into which you are translating.

The Language Development Strand
The Language modules in years one and two are intended to strengthen your language skills; they are language specific and you may learn together with students following a language programme.

The Practical Translation Strand
The Practical Translation modules in year two provide practice in the translation of a variety of text types, normally in both language directions. The Advanced Practical Translation modules are offered in the fourth year of study, after your year abroad or placement in a professional setting.

Assessment
Assessment is through a combination of coursework and examination. Coursework may include practical translations, theoretical essays, oral presentations, and research projects. Examinations may be seen or unseen.
The University's student website 24-7 has a searchable database of exam papers from previous years.
Entry requirements
You will need to have A level qualifications or equivalent in English and the language of your chosen option. If English is not your language of habitual use, you will need an IELTS level of 6.0 on the British Council scale. Offers will be made on 200-220 Tariff points.

For modules and UCAS codes for each strand see:

BA Honours Translation (English and Chinese)
BA Honours Translation (English and French)
BA Honours Translation (English and German)
BA Honours Translation (English and Italian)
BA Honours Translation (English and Spanish)
BA Honours Translation (bilingual pathway)
Major or Minor in Translation Studies


BA Honours Translation (Bilingual pathway) - University of Middlesex, London

Pathway for bilingual or near-bilingual students
Take two languages alongside English
Four years full-time, including work placement year or year abroad
Part-time study available
Modules
Semester one
Introduction to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Language A)
Transferable Skills module: Making Sense of Change
Semester two
Language Awareness
Practical Translation 2 (Language A)
Elective module
Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Language B)
Language B
Semester two
Quality in Translation
Practical Translation 2 (Language B)
Language B
Year Three
Study abroad at a translation school OR UK placement OR one semester in each

Year Four
Semester one
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text
Introduction to Screen Translation
Semester two
Translation Project (Translation Studies Strand)
Introduction to Translation Tools (Practical Translation Strand)


Translation Studies as a Major or Minor - University of Middlesex, London

Joint Honours degree
Four years full-time, including work placement year or year abroad
Part-time study available
See BA Honours Translation for programme structure, entry requirements, assessment and contact details.
Major
Translation is available as a Major in a Joint Honours degree with the following subjects:

Communication and English Language Studies
UCAS code Q9P9 P BA/TRACML
Creative and Media Writing
UCAS code Q9W8 P BA/TRACMW
English Literary Studies
UCAS code Q9Q2 P BA/TRAELS
Journalism and Communication Studies
UCAS code Q9P5 P BA/TRACMW
Publishing and Media
UCAS code Q9P4 P BA/TRAPLM
Teaching English as a Foreign Language
UCAS code Q9X1 P BA/TRATFL
Year One
Semester one
Introduction to Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Italian Language 5
Other subject module
Semester two
Language Awareness (Translation Studies Strand)
Elective module
Other subject module


Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Practical Translation Strand)
Semester two
Quality in Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Practical Translation 2 (Practical Translation Strand)
Plus three modules from your other subject over the two semesters

Year Three
Study abroad at a translation school OR UK placement OR one semester in each

Year Four
Semester one
Two of
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text
Introduction to Screen Translation
One or two other subject modules
Semester two
Electronic Tools for Translators OR Translation Project
One or two other subejct modules


Minor
Translation can be taken as a Minor in a Joint Honours degree. Check your chosen Major subject to see if the combination is possible.

Below are the Translation Studies modules you'll take if you choose Translation Studies as a Minor:

Year One
Semester one
Introduction to Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Semester two
Language Awareness (Translation Studies Strand)
Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Practical Translation Strand)
Semester two
Quality in Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Practical Translation 2 (Practical Translation Strand)
Year Three
Semester one
One of
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text
Introduction to Screen Translation
Semester two
Electronic Tools for Translation
See BA Honours Translation for programme structure, entry requirements, assessment and contact details.

Translation Studies as a Major or Minor
Joint Honours degree
Four years full-time, including work placement year or year abroad
Part-time study available
See BA Honours Translation for programme structure, entry requirements, assessment and contact details.
Major
Translation is available as a Major in a Joint Honours degree with the following subjects:

Communication and English Language Studies
UCAS code Q9P9 P BA/TRACML
Creative and Media Writing
UCAS code Q9W8 P BA/TRACMW
English Literary Studies
UCAS code Q9Q2 P BA/TRAELS
Journalism and Communication Studies
UCAS code Q9P5 P BA/TRACMW
Publishing and Media
UCAS code Q9P4 P BA/TRAPLM
Teaching English as a Foreign Language
UCAS code Q9X1 P BA/TRATFL
Year One
Semester one
Introduction to Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Italian Language 5
Other subject module
Semester two
Language Awareness (Translation Studies Strand)
Elective module
Other subject module


Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Practical Translation Strand)
Semester two
Quality in Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Practical Translation 2 (Practical Translation Strand)
Plus three modules from your other subject over the two semesters

Year Three
Study abroad at a translation school OR UK placement OR one semester in each

Year Four
Semester one
Two of
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text
Introduction to Screen Translation
One or two other subject modules
Semester two
Electronic Tools for Translators OR Translation Project
One or two other subejct modules


Minor
Translation can be taken as a Minor in a Joint Honours degree. Check your chosen Major subject to see if the combination is possible.

Below are the Translation Studies modules you'll take if you choose Translation Studies as a Minor:

Year One
Semester one
Introduction to Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Semester two
Language Awareness (Translation Studies Strand)
Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Practical Translation Strand)
Semester two
Quality in Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Practical Translation 2 (Practical Translation Strand)
Year Three
Semester one
One of
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text
Introduction to Screen Translation
Semester two
Electronic Tools for Translation


BA Honours Translation (English and Chinese) - University of Middlesex, London

Single honours degree
Four years full-time, including work placement year or year abroad or combination of both
Part-time study available
UCAS code Q9T1 P BA/TRACHI
This is the Chinese and English version of the BA Honours Translation. It can be taken by native Chinese speakers who have English as a second language or by native English speakers who have Chinese as a second language. Chinese-speaking students will improve their English alongside translation skills while English-speakers will improve their Chinese.

Modules
(Please note: native Chinese speakers replace the Chinese language development modules listed here with English language modules from Communication and English Language Studies or English Language and Teaching).

Year One
Semester one
Introduction to Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Chinese Language 1
Transferable Skills module: Making Sense of Change
Semester two
Language Awareness (Translation Studies Strand)
Chinese Language 2
Elective module

Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Practical Translation Strand)
Techniques in Speaking, Writing and Editing (CML2501)
Semester two
Quality in Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Practical Translation 2 (Practical Translation Strand)
Chinese Techniques in Writing and Editing
Year Three
Study abroad at a translation school OR UK placement OR one semester in each

Year Four
Semester one
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text OR Advanced Practical Translation 1
Introduction to Screen Translation OR Advanced Practical Translation 2
Semester two
Translation Project (Translation Studies Strand)
Introduction to Translation Tools (Practical Translation Strand) OR Advanced Practical Translation
See BA Honours Translation for programme structure, entry requirements, assessment and contact details.


BA Honours Translation Studies (English and French) - University of Middlesex, London

Single honours degree
Four years full-time, including work placement year or year abroad
Part-time study available
UCAS code Q9R1 P BA/TRAFRE
You will study the French language alongside students taking a language programme. See more on French at Middlesex.

Modules
Native French speakers can replace the French language development modules listed here with English language modules from Communication and English Language Studies or English Language and Teaching.

Year One
Semester one
Introduction to Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
French Language 5
Transferable Skills module: Making Sense of Change
Semester two
Language Awareness (Translation Studies Strand)
French Language 6
Elective module

Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Practical Translation Strand)
French 7
Semester two
Quality in Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Practical Translation 2 (Practical Translation Strand)
French 8
Year Three
Study abroad at a translation school OR UK placement OR one semester in each

Year Four
Semester one
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text
Introduction to Screen Translation
Semester two
Translation Project (Translation Studies Strand)
Introduction to Translation Tools (Practical Translation Strand)


BA Honours Translation (English and German) - University of Middlesex, London

Single honours degree
Four years full-time, including work placement year or year abroad or combination of both
Part-time study available
UCAS code Q9R2 P BA/TRAGER
Germany is one of the UK's major trade partners, stimulating demand for German-English translators. You will study the German language alongside students taking a language programme. See more on German at Middlesex.

Modules
Native German speakers can replace the German language development modules listed here with English language modules from Communication and English Language Studies or English Language and Teaching.

Year One
Semester one
Introduction to Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
German Language 5
Transferable Skills module: Making Sense of Change
Semester two
Language Awareness (Translation Studies Strand)
German Language 6
Elective module


Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Practical Translation Strand)
German 7
Semester two
Quality in Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Practical Translation 2 (Practical Translation Strand)
German 8
Year Three
Study abroad at a translation school OR UK placement OR one semester in each

Year Four
Semester one
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text
Introduction to Screen Translation
Semester two
Translation Project (Translation Studies Strand)
Introduction to Translation Tools (Practical Translation Strand)


BA Honours Translation (English and Italian) - University of Middlesex, London

Single honours degree
Four years full-time, including work placement year or year abroad
Part-time study available
UCAS code Q9R3 T BA/TRAITA
This is the Italian and English version of the BA Honours Translation. You will study the Italian language alongside students taking a language programme. See more on Italian at Middlesex.

Modules
Native Italian speakers can replace the Italian language development modules listed here with English language modules from Communication and English Language Studies or English Language and Teaching.

Year One
Semester one
Introduction to Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Italian Language 5
Transferable Skills module: Making Sense of Change
Semester two
Language Awareness (Translation Studies Strand)
Italian Language 6
Elective module


Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Practical Translation Strand)
Italian 7
Semester two
Quality in Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Practical Translation 2 (Practical Translation Strand)
Italian 8
Year Three
Study abroad at a translation school OR UK placement OR one semester in each

Year Four
Semester one
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text
Introduction to Screen Translation
Semester two
Translation Project (Translation Studies Strand)
Introduction to Translation Tools (Practical Translation Strand)


BA Honours Translation (English and Spanish) - University of Middlesex, London

Single honours degree
Four years full-time, including work placement year or year abroad
Part-time study available
UCAS code Q9R4 P BA/TRASPA
Modules
Modules in the English and Spanish language version of the BA Honours Translation include:

Native Spanish speakers can replace the Spanish language development modules listed here with English language modules from Communication and English Language Studies or English Language and Teaching.

Year One
Semester one
Introduction to Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Spanish Language 5
Transferable Skills module: Making Sense of Change
Semester two
Language Awareness (Translation Studies Strand)
Spanish Language 6
Elective module

Year Two
Semester one
Approaches to Translation
Practical Translation 1 (Practical Translation Strand)
Spanish 7
Semester two
Quality in Translation (Translation Studies Strand)
Practical Translation 2 (Practical Translation Strand)
Spanish 8
Year Three
Study abroad at a translation school OR UK placement OR one semester in each

Year Four
Semester one
Research Methods for Translators (Translation Studies Strand)
Translation and the Text
Introduction to Screen Translation
Semester two
Translation Project (Translation Studies Strand)
Introduction to Translation Tools (Practical Translation Strand)


Postgraduate Diploma/MA Translation (Audiovisual/Specialised) - Roehampton University, London

As well as a grounding in translation theory and research methods, this new programme pays special attention to the notion of accessibility to information in the audiovisual media and offers a stimulating choice of modules covering areas such as interlingual subtitling, dubbing, voice-over, surtitling for the deaf and the hard of hearing, and audiodescription for the blind and the visually impaired.

For an informal discussion about the Postgraduate Diploma/MA in Translation, please contact the Programme Convener:

General Course Information
Communication in this age of globalisation is becoming more and more complex, is increasingly multilingual and multidimensional and plays an ever important role in today’s society. International companies and institutions require their translators to be familiar with specialised discourse. The rising need for translation generally is marked by a particular surge in demand for skills in translating audiovisual and specialised texts. Our programme is an ideal platform for those who want to tackle these new professional realities. The programme is designed to ensure that you will be both a competent and capable practitioner and be able to reflect on your own practice and research.

The MA / Postgraduate Diploma in (Audiovisual / Specialised) Translation combines theory with practice, offers two specialist streams, and gives you the opportunity to take up work placements in translation companies and organizations. It is not limited to specific language pairs and you work into and out of English and another language of your choice. Certain language combinations may be available subject to demand.

Whether you are a recent BA graduate with a strong interest in languages and translation, or a professional translator seeking to enhance your qualifications and skills, our programme will refine your knowledge and practice of translating.

You can do the programme full-time or part-time.

You will be studying in one of the leading capitals of the world, in a multicultural environment with postgraduate students from all over the world who share an interest in languages and translation. Our location in London is ideal since the city has established itself in recent years as one of the main nerve centres in the world for translation in general, and audiovisual translation in particular, having being successful in attracting a large number of subtitling companies that are based very near to Roehampton.

The University has a very well equipped Languages Centre with state-of-the-art facilities. It offers an extensive range of language resources in many languages. You will have unlimited access to video and DVD viewing facilities, satellite TV, translation software, professional subtitling workstations, a suite of multimedia PCs and CR-ROM and CALL packages.

Specialist talks by practitioners will be arranged throughout the year to give you an opportunity both to keep informed about the market situation and to establish contacts with professionals in the industry.

The programme offers you two pathways, of which you have to choose one:

Audiovisual Translation
Specialised Translation

Audiovisual Translation Stream
The Audiovisual Translation programme addresses a rising market need for skills in translating for audiovisual media. It is one of the few programmes that will familiarise you with the socio-cultural, linguistic and technical dimensions that characterise this type of translation. It will equip you with the necessary skills to enter the professional market as well as with the necessary knowledge to pursue further research in this field.
The programme is taught by academic staff from Roehampton as well as by experts from the industry, who bring their professional experience into the classroom. In a supportive environment, you will produce and simulate your own translations and subtitles, working with dedicated software and high-tech industry-standard equipment.
The Audiovisual Translation programme places significant emphasis on the concept of accessibility to the media and as well as a grounding in translation theory and research methods, it will provide you with a choice of modules on subtitling, dubbing and voice-over, video games, surtitling, subtitling for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing and audio description for the blind and the partially sighted.

Specialised Translation Stream
The Specialised Translation programme addresses a rising market need for qualified translators capable of communicating and working with specialised, multilingual material in today’s global societies. It will equip you with the necessary skills to enter the professional market as well as with the necessary knowledge to pursue further research in this field.
The programme is taught by academic staff from Roehampton as well as by practising translators, who bring their professional experience and standards into the classroom. In a supportive environment, you will become familiar with computer aids for translators, you will translate web pages and will learn about the characteristics of specialised language discourses.

Key areas of study
Audiovisual Translation Stream

• Translation Theories
• Interlingual Subtitling and Surtitling
• Dubbing and Voice-over
• Video games
• Subtitling for the Deaf and the Hard-of-Hearing
• Audio description for the Blind and the Partially Sighted


Specialised Translation Stream

• Translation Theory
• Translation Tools and Localisation
• Technical and Scientific Translation
• Economic and Legal Translation
• Children’s Literature in Translation

Compulsory modules for all students
Translation Theories
The module introduces you to the main theoretical issues that have been discussed by scholars and their impact on shaping translation practice. The purpose of the module is to make you aware of the main theoretical debates that have surrounded translation through history and more particularly in the 20th century and to enable you to see the relevance of theory to the practice of translation. Key historical figures and writings on the field of translation will be examined and discussed with the aim of situating translation as a discipline in its socio-historical context. The module will also examine the crucial part these theories play when taking decisions and making choices in the translation process and how they can be applied to your own work. The module also introduces you to fundamental notions of terminology and lexicography that are relevant to translation.

Dissertation
This module provides you with the opportunity to apply the understanding, knowledge, analytical, conceptual and personal skills gained from taught modules to an in-depth investigation of a translation related topic. It consolidates the learning that has already taken place, as well as developing your capability to undertake and complete an academic dissertation. It can therefore be seen as the culmination of the entire programme. You will be expected to demonstrate an ability to relate theory to practice and to compare and evaluate alternative translations. This is a self-directed study module that will be mainly undertaken in consultation with a tutor. You will meet with your assigned supervisor in order to choose a topic that will be broad enough to sustain a project of this scope and will then work independently to research your dissertation while keeping in touch with your supervisor, via individual tutorials and e-mail, to discuss the progress of the work, identify problems and solutions, and set targets.

Audiovisual Translation Stream
Compulsory module

Interlingual Subtitling & Surtitling
This module will offer you an in-depth knowledge in the fields of subtitling and surtitling for the opera, covering areas such as film semiotics, script writing, history of subtitling/surtitling and present situation, pros and cons of subtitle versus other audiovisual translation modes, technical dimension, aesthetics of subtitling/surtitling, economic and professional aspects, subtitling/surtitling of humour and taboo, subtitling/surtitling of colloquialisms, and conventions used on the screen. Through a range of carefully chosen examples and exercises, you will not only develop confidence and skills in subtitling and surtitling, but also broaden your awareness of the idiomatic and syntactic features of the languages as well as their knowledge and perception of socio-cultural referents. You will develop subtitling and surtitling skills in a variety of registers and styles, by translating texts and programmes drawn from various sources which will include television series, sitcoms, films, cartoons, music DVDs, corporate videos, documentaries and opera and theatre productions. You will be trained to produce subtitles of a competent, professional standard and will prepare your own subtitles with industry standard subtitling equipment.

Optional modules

Dubbing and Voice-over
This module will offer you an in-depth knowledge in the fields of dubbing and voice-over, covering areas such as film semiotics, script writing, history of dubbing/voice-over and present situation, technical dimension, economic and professional aspects of dubbing/voice-over, dubbing/voice-over of humour and taboo, dubbing/voice-over of colloquialisms, and conventions used in the profession. The course will be based upon detailed study of, and practice in, dubbed/voiced-over texts and programmes drawn from various sources such as cinema, DVD, television and corporate videos, and covering a broad range of genres and media issues. The emphasis is on the development of the necessary aural, visual, written and technical skills to produce a dubbed/voiced-over programme of a competent, professional standard. You will work with media texts such as television series, sitcoms, films, cartoons, corporate videos and documentaries.

Subtitling for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (SDH) & Audio Description for the Blind and Partially Sighted (AD)
This module will offer you the opportunity of becoming familiar with this exciting new area aimed at widening accessibility to the audiovisual media for people with disabilities. SDH subtitlers transfer speech and sounds from TV programmes and films into written subtitles, also known as captions, for viewers which are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Audio describers provide spoken commentaries of visual images – films, plays, operas, etc. – for an audience which is blind or partially sighted. Contents include topics such as conventions for subtitling for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing and audio description for the blind and the partially sighted, legislation at national and international levels, history of SDH and AD and present situation, teletext versus DVD captioning, captioning and audio describing for children and adults, audio description for the museums, technical dimension, on-line/live versus off-line/pre-recorded captioning, interlingual and intralingual SDH, economic and professional aspects of SDH and AD. The course is taught in English and all the activities and learning materials are in English. You will be trained to produce subtitles of a competent, professional standard and will prepare your own subtitles with industry standard subtitling equipment.

More optional modules:

If you want, you may choose as options any module from the MA in Cinema Studies.

Based on a sample of written work, you will also be allowed to follow the module “Knowing and Subverting the Rules: Screenwriting for Independent Film”, one of the modules from the MA in Creative and Professional Writing.

Specialised Translation Stream
Compulsory module

Translation Tools & Localisation
This module offers you the opportunity to become familiar with some of the translation tools translators use in their professional life. The module will initially equip you with a sound knowledge of the theory and practice of lexicography to enable you better to use and appraise dictionaries, glossaries and electronic term banks. It will cover advanced use of technology in the translation process and web editing, focusing in the development of ICT competence and desktop publishing editing and revising skills. The module also allows you to become familiar with issues such as terminology databases, translation memory tools, and computer assisted translation systems. It teaches you how to carry out efficient documentation and how to make appropriate use of research tools in solving translation problems. It will train you in revising your own work and that of other colleagues, so that you’ll be able to diagnose potential problems with draft translations and to justify and offer alternative solutions.

Optional modules:

Technical and Scientific Translation
This module offers you the opportunity to study aspects of technical and scientific work as a basis for the translation work and any further translation-related research. It helps you develop your translation skills in a variety of registers and styles by translating texts of a technical and scientific nature. Particular attention is placed on the acquisition of the right terminology and on the use of the appropriate register and style. The module involves the study of procedures and techniques for translation and encourages the analysis of translation problems in technical and scientific texts through commentary, comparative analysis and the use of parallel texts. It is based upon detailed study of, and practice in, translating texts and exercises drawn from various sources and covering a broad range of technical and scientific issues.

Economic & Legal Translation
This module provides you with the opportunity to learn about the English legal and economic systems as a basis for the translation work and any further translation-related research. The module is designed to offer you the opportunity to study and practice aspects of economic and legal translation work and is based upon detailed study of, and practice in, translating texts and exercises drawn from various sources and covering a broad range of economic and legal issues. Particular attention is placed on the acquisition of the right terminology and on the use of the appropriate register and style. The module involves the study of procedures and techniques for translation and encourages the analysis of translation problems in economic and legal texts through commentary, comparative analysis and the use of parallel texts. You’ll work with a wide range of texts and exercises drawn from a variety of sources, including print and Internet publications dealing with economic and legal issues.

Children’s Literature in Translation
This module introduces students to a comparative approach to children’s literature studies and addresses a range of issues that are specific to translating for children. It complements other modules in the programme by addressing the translation of children’s literature from a range of historical and theoretical perspectives. The translation of children’s literature into English is the focus for the study of cross-cultural developments in children’s literatures across the world.


BA/BSc Translation - Roehampton University, London

Programme Convener
Jacqueline Page
For up to date contact details please use our online staff directory.

Translation and interpreting are two vocational ways to learn and master foreign languages. Translators work with the written word, transferring information from one particular language into the language of the people who need to know the content of the original text. Interpreters do the same but with the spoken word. Both make communication possible between people who do not share a common language.
Studying translation at Roehampton is a unique experience thanks to its ideal location in London, a magnet for international business and commerce.
You’ll learn how to translate in and out of your mother tongue and will have modules in translation theory and practice, in interpreting and in cutting edge areas such as film subtitling.
You can study Translation as a Single or Combined Honours Programme.

Single Honours
You will study Spanish and French paired with English. You’ll have an excellent command of English and will normally need an A Level or equivalent in one of the other two languages. You can take the other language at beginner’s level.

Combined Honours
You will study Spanish or French paired with English. You’ll have an excellent command of English and will normally require an A Level or equivalent in the chosen foreign language. You can combine this translation programme with one of 38 other subjects offered by Roehampton.

General Course Information
Translation is one of the most rapidly growing areas in education and a very vocational way to learn and master foreign languages. At Roehampton you can choose to study Translation in Spanish and/or French paired with English2, and you can also complement it with German or Italian if you wish, as part of our Languages for All provision. The Translation programme will offer you the opportunity of taking modules in interpreting and in cutting-edge subjects such as film subtitling. London is a magnet for international business and both Spanish and French are major European languages, exerting a considerable influence in many countries worldwide where they are official languages, such as in Latin America and Africa. We have exchanges with some of the most prestigious Schools of Translation and Interpreting in Spain, Belgium, France and Switzerland. This programme will provide you with in-depth language skills and enable you to choose from a broad range of career opportunities worldwide.

What’s involved in the first year of the Translation degree?
If you decide to follow one of the Combined Honours pathways, you’ll take compulsory modules in French/Spanish Language and in Translation Strategies. You will also have the choice of modules in Spanish/ French Culture and Society or English Language and Linguistics. Single Honours students also take Introduction to Linguistics.

What’s involved in subsequent years?
In the second year there are compulsory modules in your chosen language(s) and in Aspects of Translation, but there is also a wide choice of French and/or Spanish options available, including Computers and Translators, Translation Theories and Practice, Culture and Society, Economy, Business, Latin American and Francophone Studies, Cinema or Literature. You can also take modules from other programmes such as English Language and Linguistics. You will learn how to translate in and out of your mother tongue. The third year is spent abroad in a Spanish and/or French speaking country, usually in a School of Translation and Interpreting such as those in Granada, Barcelona, Geneva or Brussels. Students also have the option of combining study and employment abroad. In your final year you will choose from a range of options including General Translation, Audiovisual Translation, Interpreting, Spain/France in the International Context and Cinema. You will also produce your own Translation Portfolio under the supervision of a tutor: an ideal opportunity for specialisation in your chosen area.

Resources
You will have free access to the Languages Centre located in the Learning Resources Centre. This is well equipped with video viewing facilities, satellite TV, a suite of multimedia PCs and CD-ROM and CALL packages. You will have access to subtitling software, which enables you to translate audiovisual programmes, and to a wide range of materials offering self-tuition in more than 50 languages. The School of English & Modern Languages also operates a Documentation Centre which offers a full range of reference material including newspapers, magazines and information on cultural events. All students have easy access to IT facilities, Internet and email.

Teaching Methods
All teaching at Honours level is conducted in the foreign language. You will experience a variety of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, tutorials, role plays, workshops and group work. Assessment is by essays, oral presentations, portfolios, coursework dossiers and exams. The year abroad is assessed by the host university (or through your employer’s report).

Career prospects
Language skills are an asset in a wide range of careers and are increasingly in demand in translation and interpreting. Our graduates are well placed to find employment both in the UK and around the world. You can find employment with translation agencies, multinational companies, international organizations and the Civil Service. You can also go on to take further courses of study at postgraduate level. There are MPhil/PhD opportunities in all areas relating to translation and interpreting.


MA Translation Theory and Practice - UCL (University College London), London

Aims
The MA programme in Translation Theory and Practice aims to develop

an understanding of translation in its social and cultural contexts,
a grasp of the technological environment in which modern commercial and/or literary translating takes place, and,
where applicable, practical translation skills involving specific language pairs.
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Programme structure
The programme for the MA Translation Theory and Practice consists of three taught courses and a dissertation. Each course involves on average two contact hours per week over twenty weeks. Preparation for the dissertation involves an additional research skills course.

Courses
The courses available for the taught part of the programme are as follows:

1. Language-specific practical translation courses:
Advanced Translation from French into English (Click here for details)
Translation from and into German (Click here for details)
Advanced Translation from a Scandinavian language into English (Click here for details)
Advanced Translation from English into a Scandinavian language (Click here for details)
Literary Translation from Dutch into English (Click here for details)
Practical Translation from Dutch into English (Click here for details)
Advanced Russian (Click here for details)

2. Translation studies courses:
Translation Studies (Click here for details)
Language and Translation (taught at Imperial College) (Click here for details)
Translation Technology (taught at Imperial College, places subject to availability) (Click here for details)

3. Electronic Communication and Publishing modules (two modules are equivalent to one course)
Principles of Computing and Information Technology (Click here for details)
Internet Technologies (Click here for details)
Electronic Publishing (Click here for details)
Systems Management (Click here for details)
Introduction to Programming and Scripting (Click here for details)
Legal and Social Aspects (Click here for details)
Digital Resources in the Humanities (Click here for details)
XML (Click here for details)

See the Pathways through the Programme section below for ways in which these courses and modules can be combined.

Dissertation
The dissertation, a piece of work of some 12,000 to 15,000 words in length, can consist either of an annotated translation (60% translation, 40% introduction and annotation) or of a critical discussion of theoretical or practical aspects of translation. The topic of the dissertation may be freely chosen by the student, subject to approval by the MA programme’s academic coordinator. Preparation for the dissertation involves a research skills course. The dissertation itself is written under one-to-one supervision and submitted at the beginning of September.

Click here to see a list of recent dissertations on translation topics.

Research skills
All students take a research skills course covering such things as

information retrieval and processing
the efficient and critical use of electronic resources
project management
bibliographical referencing
dissertation writing techniques
Part of this course is taken as a self-access programme using the electronic learning platform WebCT.

Pathways through the MA Programme
Several pathways through the programme are possible, depending on whether you wish to concentrate on practical translation skills, on electronic publishing, or on more theoretical aspects of translation.

The choices are as follows:

Element 1:
EITHER a language-specific practical translation course selected from the following list:
Advanced Translation French into English
Translation from and into German
Advanced Translation from a Scandinavian language into English)
Advanced Translation from English into a Scandinavian language
Literary Translation from Dutch into English
Practical Translation Dutch into English
Advanced Russian language and translation
OR Translation Studies

Element 2:
EITHER any two Electronic Communication and Publishing modules selected from the following list:
Principles of Computing and Information Technology
Internet Technologies
Electronic Publishing
Systems Management
Introduction to Programming and Scripting
Legal and Social Aspects
Digital Resources in the Humanities
XML
OR Translation Studies

Element 3:
ONE of the following:

two further Electronic Communication and Publishing modules
Translation Studies
Language and Translation (taught at Imperial College)
Translation Technology (taught at Imperial College, places subject to availability)

Element 4:
Dissertation

EITHER an annotated translation (60% translation, 40% annotation)
OR a critical discussion of theoretical or practical aspects of translation

Here are some sample pathways through the programme:
Theory and practice pathway:
A language-specific practical translation course
+
Translation Studies
+
Electronic Communication and Publishing 2 modules
+
Dissertation (theoretical or practical)

Electronic publishing pathway:
Either a language-specific practical translation course
Or Translation Studies
+
Electronic Communication and Publishing 2 modules
+
Electronic Communication and Publishing 2 further modules
+
Dissertation (practical translation)

Theory pathway:
Translation Studies
+
Electronic Communication and Publishing 2 modules
+
Either Language and Translation [taught at Imperial College]
Or Electronic Communication and Publishing 2 further modules
+
Dissertation on theoretical/historical topic

Practical translation pathway:
A language-specific practical translation course
+
Electronic Communication and Publishing 2 modules
+
Either Translation Studies
Or Language and Translation [taught at Imperial College]
+
Dissertation (practical translation)

Technology pathway:
Either a language-specific practical translation course
or Translation Studies
+
Electronic Communication and Publishing 2 modules
+
Either Electronic Communication and Publishing 2 further modules
Or Translation Technology [taught at Imperial College, subject to availability]
+
Dissertation (theoretical or practical)

Duration
The programme can be followed full-time over one calendar year (September to September) or part-time over two calendar years. Part-time students normally take two taught courses in their first year and the remaining course plus the dissertation in their second year.

Teaching is spread over two Terms, from the end of September till the end of March, with a break around mid December. Examinations are scheduled in May-June. The dissertation is submitted at the beginning of September.

Contact hours
Contact hours per week vary, depending on the particular combination of courses you select. Full-time students can normally expect around 6 to 7 contact hours per week. Some of these will be lectures, others seminars. The rest of the time is spent on reading and coursework. There are also regular meetings with your personal tutor and, later in the year, with your dissertation supervisor.

Teaching takes place over two Terms, which normally run from the end of September until mid December (Term 1) and from early January until late March (Term 2). The third Term, typically from late April till mid June, is reserved for revision and examinations.

Preparation for the dissertation usually involves three to four meetings with your dissertation supervisor as well as a research skills course.

Assessment
Each course comes with its own assessment format, as follows:

Language-specific practical translation courses:
Advanced Translation French into English: three-hour unseen examination (100%)
Translation from and into German: three-hour unseen examination (100%)
Advanced Translation from a Scandinavian into English): coursework (30%) and examination (70%)
Advanced Translation from English into a Scandinavian language: coursework (70%) and examination (30%)
Literary Translation from Dutch into English: coursework (30%) and project (70%)
Practical Translation Dutch into English: project (100%)
Advanced Russian: three-hour unseen examination (100%, of which 15% concerns translation skills)
Electronic Communication and Publishing modules:
Principles of Computing and Information Technology: essay (50%) and three-hour written examination (50%)
Internet Technologies: two projects (30% and 70%)
Electronic Publishing: two projects (50% each)
Systems Management: one essay (100%)
Introduction to Programming and Scripting: coursework (50%) and project (50%)
Legal and Social Aspects: two essays (50% each)
XML: two projects (30% and 70%)
Digital Resources in the Humanities: essay (50%) and project (50%)
Translation studies courses:
Translation Studies: essay (50%) and take-home examination paper (50%)
Language and Translation (taught and assessed at Imperial College): essay (50%) and three-hour examination (50%)
Translation Technology (taught at Imperial College): two projects (25% each) and one essay (50%)

Research in Translation Studies
Research degrees
Programme of study
Research training
Thesis
Some recent and current theses
Resources
Admission
Funding


Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) or of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in Translation Studies - UCL (University College London), London

Suitably qualified candidates can study for the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) or of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) in Translation Studies.

The PhD requires a minimum of three years’ full-time study (four years’ part-time). It consists of original research leading to a thesis of approximately 100,000 words.

The MPhil is a research degree of the shorter type, normally requiring two years’ full-time study (four years part-time). Research for the MPhil leads to a thesis of around 60,000 words.

Research topics can be in translation theory and history covering virtually any European language. Candidates normally propose their own research topics. For topics involving non-European languages and cultures, joint supervision with the School of Oriental and African Studies may be possible.

Students can study on a full-time or part-time basis; part-time non-residential registration is also possible.

All research students initially register for the MPhil degree; they can upgrade to the PhD after a minimum of one year’s full-time study (or two years part-time), provided their work is of a sufficient standard.

Programme of study
Research students do not follow a prescribed course of study but carry out their own research project under the guidance of personal Supervisors.

All research students have both a Principal Supervisor and a Subsidiary Supervisor. You will normally register in the department of your Principal Supervisor. In the case of joint supervision a student can register in either department.

Research skills training is an essential part of the programme. See the section below for details.

Research training
The UCL Graduate School offers a range of induction and skills training courses for all research students.

UCL’s School of Library, Archive and Information Studies (SLAIS) also offers a web-based self-access course on ‘Information Resources for the Humanities’, which makes use of the electronic learning environment WebCT.

Translation-specific research training is available as well. Students can attend various research training summer schools, including the two-week residential Translation Research Summer School (TRSS) which UCL organizes jointly with the Universities of Manchester and Edinburgh in June-July every year. UCL students can attend the Translation Research Summer School free of charge. See the Resources page for details.

The AHRB Centre for Asian and African Literatures, which is run jointly by UCL and the nearby School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), offers research training in comparative literary and cultural studies for students from both UCL and SOAS.

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Thesis
Study for the degree of MPhil/PhD in Translation Studies results in the submission of a thesis. The thesis is a book-length work based on research.

A PhD thesis may be up to 100,000 words and must form a distinct contribution to knowledge, show evidence of original thought and appropriate research, and be suitable for publication as submitted or in an abridged or modified form.

A thesis for the degree of MPhil runs to approximately 60,000 words. It should be either a record of original work or a thorough and critical exposition of existing knowledge.

Some recent and current theses
Recent and current work in translation studies within the Faculty of Arts and Humanities includes theses on such topics as:

The Alien Within. Translations of popular fiction into German during the Nazi regime
Intertextuality and genre in the translation and reception of David Lodge’s campus novels in Spain
Travelling Theory. Translating French feminism in the Anglophone world, French structuralism in Turkey
The semiotics of Charles Sanders Peirce applied to issues of translation
Taiwanese ‘local’ literature in English translation [supervisied jointly with SOAS]
Translation and narration. Computer-assisted analysis of style, as applied to Virginia Woolf’s novels and their French translations
The translation and reception of Ernest Hemingway in China [supervisied jointly with SOAS]
Babysitting the Reader. Translating fiction for girls from English into Dutch in the postwar era
Translation and power. Joseph Conrad in Chinese translation [supervisied jointly with SOAS]
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Resources
The graduate programme in translation studies draws on the combined expertise of staff in the language and literature departments of the Arts and Humanities Faculty, in the School of Library, Archive and Information Studies (SLAIS) and in the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES).

The library resources available to UCL students and researchers are unrivalled. Apart from UCL’s own Library and the University of London Library, there are the specialised collections of UCL’s School of Slavonic and East European Studies and of the nearby School of Oriental and African Studies, the various research institutes and the School of Advanced Study of the University of London (SAS) and, beyond these, the more than twenty million volumes in the British Library. All these libraries are within a few minutes’ walking distance of UCL.

Admission
Candidates for a research degree should possess a good MA degree (or equivalent) in translation studies, in a language and culture subject or in another relevant field. Admission is normally dependent on the submission of a detailed research proposal.

Application forms, general information about admission for a research degree at UCL and copies of the Graduate School Prospectus (with details about accommodation and fees) may be obtained from the Admissions Office. For academic advice contact either the relevant department or Professor Theo Hermans.

See the ‘Contacts’ page for UCL’s Accommodation Office and International Office.

Funding
All prospective research students can apply for UCL Graduate School Research Scholarships. Go to the Graduate School pages for details.

UK and EU nationals can apply for studentships offered by the Arts and Humanities Research Board (AHRB).

Applicants from outside the European Union can apply for Overseas Research Studentships and for a range of special scholarships. Details of these can be obtained from the UCL Graduate School.


MA Interpreting, Translation & Diplomacy (MA ITD) - University of Westminster, London

Diplomats working in and out of two languages as government interpreters and translators.

MA ITD is equally divided between interpreting, translation, diplomatic studies, and a thesis which students write on a subject related to their own professional interests. The course therefore offers an academic context for translators and interpreters working in the following areas:

Diplomacy
Private sector employment
Government (central and local) public administration, diplomacy, NGOs
Communications

MA ITD is offered as a full-time and part-time course; note that only certain language combinations run each year.


MA/Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate in Technical and Specialised Translation (Full-time & Part-time) - University of Westminster, London

Summary

This course is for non-native speakers of English, whose mother tongue is Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Polish or Spanish. You will learn to translate specialised technical texts from English into your mother tongue and vice versa. Also available part-time.

Description


MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Bilingual Translation - University of Westminster, London

1 year full-time or 2 year part-time day

Aims and Learning Outcomes
The MA in Bilingual Translation aims to:
train language specialists (new graduates as well as mature/experienced students) to a professional level in translation;
familiarise you with up-to-date information and terminology both in English and your mother tongue in relation to the various specialised fields covered by the course;
give you insights at the practical level into the various aspects of a career in professional translation and, at the academic level, into the actual process of translation.

Successful completion of this training programme means you will be able to:
produce accurate and commercially acceptable translations of a technical and specialised nature from English into your mother tongue, applying (where appropriate) insights drawn from the formal study of linguistics and translation theory;
produce accurate translations from your mother tongue into English;
after completion of the relevant option module, act as revisers and editors of translations;
research complex technical and specialised topics for the purposes of translation in a professional context.

Course Content and Structure
This course, for native speakers of Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Polish or Spanish, covers:
translation from English into the mother tongue of specialised technical and institutional texts (your Main Language core module)
translation (for information purposes) of similar texts from the mother tongue into English (your Second Language core module).

Together with either an MA Thesis or an MA Project, these two modules constitute the modules constitute the core requirements for this course.

You may also undertake translation from a language other than English into your mother tongue, a Subsidiary Language. Availability of Subsidiary Language modules is subject to demand. The range currently includes French into Arabic/Greek/Italian/Portuguese/Spanish and Spanish into French/Italian. In addition to the Subsidiary Languages, we offer a range of translation-related option modules (including Subtitling, Machine Translation, Editing Skills, Interpreting Skills) and linguistics options (Translation Theory, Written Discourse Analysis, Sociolinguistics, Creole Linguistics and a work experience module, Field Study). Modules currently offered on this course are listed below.

Core modules
Main Language (Translation from English into the mother tongue)
Second Language (Translation from the mother tongue into English)
MA Project or
MA Thesis

Option modules
Advanced English Language Skills
Advanced Arabic Language Skills
Creole Linguistics
Written Discourse Analysis
Editing Skills (language(s) subject to annual confirmation)
Field Study (a work experience module)
Independent Research Seminar
Interpreting Skills (language(s) subject to confirmation)
Introduction to Technical Writing

Literary Translation: Theory and Practice (languages subject to annual confirmation)
Machine Translation
Pragmatics

Principles of Science and Technology
Semantics
Sociolinguistics
Subsidiary Language (translation into the mother tongue from a range of languages subject to annual confirmation)
Translation Theory
Subtitling

The option modules are offered subject to demand.

All core modules and the optional Advanced Arabic, Subsidiary Language and Literary Translation modules are year-long. The remaining electives each run for one semester. Assessment of the core translation modules is through a combination coursework and formal examinations, while most optional modules are assessed through coursework alone.

Employment and Research
Graduates find employment as in-house translators within industry, commerce and international organizations, or on a freelance or self-employed basis.

Entrance Requirements and Admissions Procedures
To apply for this course you will need to fulfil the following requirements:
i you will be a mother tongue speaker of either Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Polish or Spanish
ii you will hold an undergraduate degree (or equivalent)

Applications from mature, non-graduate applicants with appropriate work experience in lieu of a degree will also be considered.

Applicants without formal qualifications will be sent test translations to complete and return. Offers of places are normally made on the basis of qualifications or performance in the test translations, which must demonstrate the required level of linguistic and translation skills. Applicants may also be invited for interview.

The list of translation courses shown above is not all inclusive and the translation courses shown will be subject to change, addition and removal.

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